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Folate-Rich Foods

by in Vitamins January 17, 2008

PhotobucketWhat Is Folate?
Folate, also known as Folic Acid, is one of several B vitamins found in foods and is vital to making new, healthy body cells. A particular form of anemia can result from a folate deficiency. Lack of folate also affects the development of new red blood cells so they cannot carry as much oxygen.
Women between the ages of 14 and 50 should make sure to include plenty of folic acid in their eating plan to reduce a potential baby’s risk of devastating birth defects of the brain and spinal cord, known as neural-tube defects. Studies estimate that up to 70% of these serious birth defects may be prevented by eating enough folate-containing foods, as well as folic acid-fortified foods.
Additionally, increased consumption of folate rich fruits, vegetables and whole grains is highly recommended to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.
How to Include More Folate
Many fruits, vegetables, and legumes are an excellent source of this powerful vitamin. Start by adding just one more serving of a fruit or vegetable each day. In addition to folate, these foods provide other important vitamins, as well as fiber.
• Top favorite breakfast cereals or yogurt with slices of ripe strawberries.
• Toss some fresh spinach into salads. Top with low-fat salad dressing.
• Stir-fry fresh asparagus, cauliflower, or broccoli with garlic and a splash of sesame oil for a flavorful side dish.
• Make a colorful fruit salad by tossing together fresh berries, watermelon cubes, pineapple wedges, and orange sections.
• Add beans and legumes to pasta dishes, soups, and fresh salads.
Sources of Folate
Fruits:
Orange- medium, Orange juice- 1 cup, Strawberries- 8 medium, Avocado- ½ medium
Vegetables (1 cup, raw or ½ cup, cooked):
Spinach, Green peas, Broccoli, Okra, Mustard greens, Collards, Turnip greens, Romaine lettuce, Asparagus, 5 spears cooked
Beans & Legumes (½ cup, cooked):
Chickpeas, Kidney beans, Black beans, Navy beans, Pinto beans, Black-eyed peas, Chick peas (garbanzos), Lentils, Peanuts, 1 oz.
Strawberry Fruit Salad with Three Dressings
8 cups lightly packed
spinach leaves
1 pint basket strawberries,
stemmed and halved
4 cups assorted melon chunks 1 ½ cups orange and grapefruit
segments
Orange-mint, strawberry-ginger, or
balsamic-pepper dressing
Line platter or 4 individual plates with spinach. Top with fruits, dividing equally. Serve with your choice of dressing on the side.
Makes 4 servings.
Orange-Mint Dressing:
In bowl, whisk 1, 8-ounce container plain nonfat yogurt, 3 tablespoons thawed orange juice concentrate, and 1-teaspoon sugar. Mix in 3 tablespoons chopped mint. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days.
Makes about 1 cup.
Strawberry-Ginger Dressing:
In blender or food processor, purée 1-½ cups strawberries; transfer to bowl. Mix in 1 ½ to 2 tablespoons honey, 1-½ tablespoons lime juice, 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger, and a pinch of salt. Use immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days.
Makes about 1 cup.
Balsamic-Pepper Dressing:
In bowl, whisk 1 8-ounce container nonfat strawberry yogurt, 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar, 1 teaspoon honey, and ½ to 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate up to 2 days.
Makes about 1 cup.
For more information:
Visit the American Dietetic Association website @ http://www.eatright.org

2 Comments
  1. […] our children to eat green and yellow vegetables rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, beta carotene and folic acid, avoid smoking, and avoid unsafe sex practices. (Sources: Int J Cancer. 2005 Nov 20;117(4):629-37. […]

  2. […] our children to eat green and yellow vegetables rich in vitamin C, vitamin E, beta carotene and folic acid, avoid smoking, and avoid unsafe sex practices. (Sources: Int J Cancer. 2005 Nov 20;117(4):629-37. […]

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