High Blood Pressure: 21 Natural Remedies

PhotobucketWhat are the Best Natural Medicines for High Blood Pressure?

By Dr. Nicole Sundene, Naturopathic Physician

High blood pressure or “hypertension” is a tough nut to crack with natural medicines. Of course, there are many etiologies to this common disease; however, most cases are because we have gotten fat, old, and out of shape. Yes, there are exceptions to the rule, so don’t be hitting the contact form to send me hate mail.

Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

New Year’s Resolution: Don’t Fall for the Monkey Trap

Photobucket

 By Bonnie Pfiester, Fitness Trainer

Moving on in many ways means saying goodbye. The problem is, goodbyes are often hard, even when the place we are headed may be a good place to be.

I don’t know why it is so hard to let go of the past, but it is. We prefer the “known” over the unknown I guess. Ironically, we often prefer the known even if the known is not a good place to be.

It may sound crazy, but I believe many of us don’t get to experience a lot of great things in life because we have such a strong grip on the past. This issue can also affect us when attempting to make New Year’s resolutions – especially when it comes to weight loss.

It reminds me the story of the monkey trap. The trap is basically a hollowed out coconut filled with rice. The coconut, which is chained to a stake, has a small hole in it just big enough for the monkey’s hand to go in but too small for his closed fist of rice to come out. Crazy as it seems, the monkey cannot see that freedom without rice is more valuable than being captured with it and is trapped.

Like the monkey, we are often scared of losing something, like a favorite food or a certain lifestyle. While pride may stand in the way for some, others hold on to excuses. Unfortunately, many people simply accept things the way they are as if there were no other choice. In essence, we are no different than the monkey – trapped by our own decisions.

Sometimes we need to take a closer look at what is standing in the way of our success.
What do we have such a tight grip on? What has kept us from making our New Year’s Resolutions stick last year or what prevented us from even making them to begin with? Whatever your answer is, this year is the year to let go so you can move on.

~Bonnie

bonniefit.jpgBonnie Pfiester is a Personal Trainer, wife to the famous fitness trainer Steve Pfiester of the reality TV show “Fat March”, and owner of the women’s health club Longevity Fitness.

You can enjoy more of Bonnie’s fitness and beauty articles at www.BonniePfiester.com or here at the kitchen table by visiting the Bonnie Pfiester page.

You are invited to leave your fitness and sports nutrition questions in the comments below for Bonnie to briefly answer or write about in future articles.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

How to Quit Smoking

By Life Coach, Tim Brownson

As a certified hypnotherapist people sometimes call me for help with quitting smoking. The first question I ask them is why they want to stop? That usually generates a look of horror akin to if I’d asked them if they could marry their 13-year-old daughter have a goat as the Maid of Honor and Michael Jackson as my best man.

However, there is a positive intention behind every action you commit even if sometimes it isn’t immediately apparent. That applies to smoking too.

Until you accept that there is an upside to the habit that you’d like to break then you will struggle with breaking it because you are in conflict with your unconscious mind (and your unconscious mind will always win that particular battle). After all, if there really were no upside you wouldn’t do it.

Firstly, you have to want to change. By that I mean it’s not usually enough to want to want to, you need to actually want to. Make sense? What do you mean “Not really sure?” Ok, seeing as it’s you and you’re having a tough day I’ll explain in a bit more detail.

You may well want to give up because you know it’s healthier not to smoke, it’s expensive and makes you feel like a social pariah. That is wanting to want to. A real desire to stop is a different proposition altogether and most people know it when they feel it. You don’t have to justify it to yourself with you just know you want to quit.

Most ex-smokers will tell you that they positively knew when they had made the decision to quit for good. They’ll also often tell you that it felt great and they just knew they would never smoke again,

When you know you want to definitely quit, you then need to look at the ecology of quitting. Will you have to avoid certain places for the short-term? Are there other family members or close friends that smoke that need to understand you’re quitting? If they’re not supportive and will try and tempt you to the dark side, can you actually just avoid them completely?

Don’t underestimate the importance of being aware of the ecology. This is something that people frequently fail to take into account. As a result they fail and don’t really know why.

Now look for the REAL reason you want to quit. Good health isn’t enough. Why do you want that good health? Dig deep with this one. We’re into the realms of values now and we want to get to the core of who you are as a person and what really motivates and drives you.

The greater the motivation, the better the chance of success, so really tap into what you want to achieve in your life and keep this in the forefront of your mind because it’s why you’re going through this.

Now you’re ready to set a date between 2 and 4 weeks away for your new behavior to start. Times of year that you may associate with smoking like New Years and vacations (unless you’re off on a Buddhist retreat) are usually less than ideal. Write the date down in your planner and stick to it.

Tell everybody and anybody that means anything o you what you are planning to do. If you have kids of an age that can understand, make a promise to them too. Then tell the rest of the world too. When I did something similar with all sorts of stuff from alcohol to red meat, I blogged about it.

Start using positive language. You’re not trying to quit, you have quit. Dump the word try because it implies failure.

Make a list of what you have to gain from quitting and post it where you see it everyday. Look past the obvious things like health and money. Do you want an improved sense of taste and smell and more energy? How about being able to relax after a great meal rather than huddling outside in the rain just so you can have a cigarette? What others can you think of?

Now make a list of what you have to lose if you fail. Promise that you will read it whenever you feel the urge to backslide. Again, don’t limit this to death and poverty because there’s a lot more to go at than that.

The really crucial part of all this is to move yourself to a state where you no longer see yourself as a smoker. You remove it from your identity completely.

Visualize yourself every night and first thing in the morning as the person that you want to be. Do this before you even start the change process. See what you will look like. Hear what you will sound like and feel what you will feel like. Really take time to savoir the new you! Play about with the picture and sounds in your head and make them as appealing as possible to you.

Importantly with the visualization, see yourself dealing with and overcoming temptation with ease and confidence and know that is a behavior available to you.

Optional extra. If you have the stomach for this, a really powerful thing to do is research the effects of smoking on health. With the Internet it’s not difficult to do and you can be looking at pictures of the gruesome effects smoking can have on the human body in no time at all.

If you succumb, use it as a learning experience and not an excuse to beat yourself up. Look at what caused the brief set back and start again even more determined to be the person you want to be!

The above strategy can undoubtedly help you quit smoking. However, if you can use it conjunction with hypnotherapy and you are committed to quitting, then I think the odds are stacked heavily in your favor. You may also want to check out the NLP technique developed by Richard Bandler called ‘The Swish Pattern’ which can be very powerful.

Tim Brownson is a life coach and the author of the fabulous little book of questions “Don’t ask Stupid Questions”.

Feel free to subscribe to his newsletter, grab a copy of his book, or check in for more life coaching tips at aDaringAdventure.com.

To learn more about Tim and his life coaching techniques you may also read an interview at the kitchen table “What is a Life Coach?”. If you are a health professional and would like to be interviewed at the kitchen table, simply contact us.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Immune Support Breakfast

PhotobucketThis is intended to be used to strengthen the Immune System and is not designed to be hypoallergenic. Modify as needed for your personal dietary needs.

4 cups Rolled Grains

Begin by using the following proportions, adjust as necessary: 2 cups rolled oats (flakes); use 4 cups if other grains are unavailable. 2 cups other rolled grains; i.e. rye, barley, and/or rolled rice flakes.

2 cups Oat Bran

1/2 cup Fresh/Dried Fruit/Seeds
Raisins, dates, blueberries, etc. (unsulphered only)

1 cup Sunflower Seeds and/or Pumpkin seeds (can be ground)

1 cup Nuts
Begin with walnuts and almonds

1 cup Lecithin Granules

1 cup Ground Flax Seed

1 cup Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum Seeds)

1/2 cup Chia Seeds (Optional)

Spices Try coriander, fennel, and/or turmeric. Begin with 1 tsp. of each. Experiment with ginger, cinnamon and other herbs/spices.

• Grind flax seeds and milk thistle seeds (available at health food stores) in a coffee grinder, blender, or meat grinder. Next, combine all ingredients and keep in refrigerator.
• Soak for 30 minutes or longer before eating (i.e. overnight). Use water, nutmilk, rice milk, apple juice, etc.
• To make almond milk, blend 1/2 cup almonds with 2 cups water in a blender.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Are You On the Sumo Wrestler Diet?

PhotobucketBy Bonnie Pfiester Fitness Trainer

Have you ever wondered what Sumo wrestlers eat to look the way they do? Recently, out of curiosity, I decided to do my own research and I was shocked at my findings. The Sumo diet looked a little too familiar.

First, Sumo wrestlers typically eat only two times a day, skipping breakfast to keep their metabolism low. This is also a common practice in America. Whether it’s a lack of time or appetite, many people skip breakfast. I don’t know about you, but the next time I’m tempted to skip breakfast I’ll picture myself as a Sumo wrestler.

The next rule for the overweight athlete is to nap after eating. Their secret to gaining weight is to sleep for at least 4 hours after each meal. Although most American’s don’t take 4-hour naps, we typically return to our office chair with little activity.

Next on the agenda for a weight gaining diet is to eat socially as much as possible. Believe it or not, according to leading researchers, a meal eaten with others can be at least forty percent larger and have thirty percent more calories and fat. The only way to combat this one is to limit eating while socializing and practice self-control.

Another component to the diet is what a Sumo wrestler drinks. Their drink of choice is beer – and lots of it. Alcohol increases cortisol levels helping wrestlers store more fat around their abdomen. That gives a whole new meaning to the term beer belly.

Finally, the wrestler overeats at night. The traditional meal for a Sumo wrestler is a stew, called Chanko-nabe, which is made up of a meat, rice and vegetables. Surprisingly, the stew is not high in fat. The key to their weight gain is the sheer volume of food they eat.

PhotobucketOnce the final meal is eaten, the Sumo wrester hits the sack in order to store as much food as fat instead of storing it in the muscles and organs as nutrients. Similarly, most Americans also eat their largest meal late in the day with little time before going bed. If we don’t go to sleep right away, we do the next best thing which typically includes a couch and a television.

Although this is normally where I would insert a powerful closing statement, I think the Sumo wrestler said it all.

~Bonnie

Bonnie Pfiester is a Personal Trainer, wife to the famous fitness trainer Steve Pfiester of the reality TV show “Fat March”, and owner of the women’s health club Longevity Fitness.

You can enjoy more of Bonnie’s fitness and beauty articles at www.BonniePfiester.com or here at the kitchen table by visiting the Bonnie Pfiester page.

You are invited to leave your fitness and sports nutrition questions in the comments below for Bonnie to briefly answer or write about in future articles.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Sunshine Carrots with Basil

December 5, 2010 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Kitchen Sink, Recipes

PhotobucketA great classic.  With cooler days upon us, serve this as a side dish that will warm you up and tantalize your taste buds.

Ingredients

  • 5 med. carrots
  • 1 tbsp. turbinado sugar
  • 1 tsp. organic cornstarch
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ginger
  • 1/8 Tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 Tsp. basil
  • 1/4 c. orange juice, freshly squeezed
  • 2 tbsp. organic butter

Method

  1. Cut carrots however you prefer.
  2. Boil in water for about 10 minutes or until almost tender.
  3. Meanwhile combine sugar, cornstarch, salt, basil, cinnamon and ginger in a small saucepan.
  4. Add orange juice; cook, stirring constantly until thick and bubbly.
  5. Boil 1 minute. Add butter.
  6. Pour over drained carrots.
  7. Toss and serve.
  8. Enjoy!

Zesty Tip: When cooking any root vegetable that you will later add a sauce too – make sure to slightly undercook your vegetables as they will continue to cook in the sauce.  To stop the cooking process after boiling them or steaming them – you can shock them in ice water.

For more simple, easy and healthy recipes, head over and check out zestycook.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Autism: Gluten Free?

For a success story involving autism and the GFCF diet, read Jake’s Story.

By Dr. Selena Eon, ND

The prevalence of autistic spectrum disorders appears to be increasing, either through increased incidence or through better diagnosis.

Currently, there is no known cause, and no known cure.

Without a known cure, desperate families are turning to a variety of potential treatments discovered through the internet, television and other parents.

These new therapies may work, however, at this point in time there is no scientific evidence that ANY treatment works for autism.

Without known treatments, families are left with a choice: to either do nothing, or to try alternative treatments. Many families make the choice to try a variety of potential treatments rather than do nothing. These treatments can become expensive.

Frequently, parents need to do something to help even if there’s no scientific data to support the efficacy of the chosen treatment. If your child has autism now, waiting for scientific research validating any treatment could take years, or even decades—while your child goes untreated into adulthood. I certainly understand why a parent would choose to treat rather than to sit by and do nothing! Yet, it is extraordinarily important to ensure that all treatments are not harmful and in the long-term best interest of the affected child and their family.

The GFCF diet is the most popular treatment for autism. The GFCF diet is completely gluten-free and casein-free. Therefore, no wheat, spelt, kamut, triticale, rye, barley, semolina or dairy! As gluten and dairy are frequently found in prepared foods, this diet requires careful attention to detail and should only be implemented when appropriate and with adequate foresight.

Interest towards a GFCF diet as a treatment for autism grew after a study by Cade. 87% of the children in the study had high levels of IgG to gliadin, and that 30% of the children had high levels of antibodies to casein or gluten. An astonishing 81% of the children were considered improved by parent and teacher reports after 3 months on the diet. Unfortunately, this diet study lacked a control group of children who were not following the GFCF diet.

Therefore, the results have been widely discounted by scientists and physicians. I was particularly interested in how the number of children with antibodies to gluten was very similar to those who were considered improved at the end of the trial, leading me to believe that the children who demonstrated improvement on the GFCF diet were likely gluten intolerant or had celiac disease. More on this subject later!

It is incredibly important for scientists to continue investigating the effects of this diet systematically, in well-controlled trials. At the present time, there is no strong research that supports the use of a GFCF diet as a treatment for autism, despite the diet’s position as one of the most popular treatments for autism.

It is hypothesized that some autistic symptoms may be the result of opoid peptides formed in the intestine from incomplete digestion of foods containing gluten and casein. In a person with “leaky gut”—increased gut digestion and gut permeability, the gluten and casein that should be completely digested are not, and these larger molecules are able to pass directly into the bloodstream. In a healthy gut, proteins are digested fully and absorbed as individual peptides (the building blocks of proteins) rather than as complete proteins.

After the gluten/casein enter the bloodstream, they may be capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier—a protective group of cells that selectively allow molecules to enter the central nervous system. The gluten/casein proteins have a similar appearance and chemical makeup to opoids, and may be capable of affecting the internal opiate system and transmission between nerve cells.

Much of this process is not fully understood, but it is possible that opoidlike peptides affect the central nervous system in such a way that increases stereotypical behaviors, ritualistic behaviors, perseveration, hyperactivity, speech/language delays and other oddities frequently seen in autism.

The leaky-gut opoid theory above depends upon the presence of a leaky gut, and there is evidence that points towards this being the case in many causes of autism. It is common for autistic children to experience GI symptoms that could be a result of leaky gut, including diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain and reflux. A number of studies have reported significant dysfunction of the gastrointestinal system in autistic children.

As a naturopathic physician, I firmly believe in treating the whole person rather than a “condition” or symptoms. I often spend time thinking about a patient and trying to elicit what is the root cause of their health concerns. The success of the GFCF diet in many cases of autism leads me to wonder if gluten and dairy intolerance are more common in autistic populations.

I don’t believe removing foods from a person’s diet forever is appropriate without good reason to back up the suspicion that the food is problematic. But, I am aware of the tremendous impact that removing problem foods can have on health! It is important to carefully consider each case as an individual before making the decision to remove foods from an autistic child’s diet, and also, to not neglect removing additional foods, as appropriate.

Overt celiac disease presents in at least 1:133 people and may be found in higher rates within the autistic population. It is advisable to test for celiac disease through bloodwork before beginning a gluten-free diet for any reason, including autism treatment. This is because once the person eliminates gluten from their diet, future blood tests are likely to be negative, even if the person does have celiac disease.

Recommended tests to include are: Anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA) both IgA and IgG, Anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA) – IgA, Anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG) – IgA andTotal IgA levels.

Patients who test positive in a full celiac panel can then be monitored for compliance with the diet. If they follow the diet, subsequent results (titers) should be lower after a period of time; if they fall off the diet secretly or accidentally, the celiac panel can provide evidence of the lapse. This is particularly helpful if dealing with a child who may sneak unacceptable foods without the family being aware or in situations in which the family may not be following the diet accurately.

But if the patient goes gluten-free without the testing, there will be no pre-diet baseline test results, and no way to objectively assess compliance. Also, as celiac disease is hereditary, a positive test indicates a higher level of suspicion in other family members. Celiac can present with a wide variety of symptoms, some of which are not gastrointestinal, therefore being aware that celiac disease runs in a particular family can be very helpful.

It is important to know that even if a full celiac panel comes back negative, this does not mean the child is not gluten intolerant. Additional research is sorely needed in the topic of gluten intolerance, but gluten intolerance appears to present on a spectrum, much like autism. At one end are individuals who test positive for celiac—the most severe of gluten intolerance. The rest of the spectrum is made up of the many individuals who should not consume gluten who do not have celiac disease.

This condition is frequently termed “non-celiac gluten intolerance”. Gluten intolerance is linked to a variety of conditions including infertility, poor quality dental enamel, neurological disorders, skin conditions, diabetes and a variety of autoimmune disorders. A person need not have gastrointestinal symptoms to be gluten intolerant.

At present, testing for gluten intolerance is not scientifically validated, although Enterolab has a stool test that appears to be fairly accurate in detecting cases of non-celiac gluten intolerance. Other labs also offer similar tests that can be helpful. Genetic testing for celiac disease is also available. A positive genetic test only shows if a person has the most common genetic markers found in celiac disease/gluten intolerance.

It appears possible to test positive on a genetic test for celiac disease and never develop celiac or overt gluten intolerance. Many labs offer blood and stool testing for dairy intolerance as well, I recommend including this testing along with testing for gluten intolerance. The testing topic is very complex and much is still unknown about the gluten intolerance- celiac disease spectrum. Most families will be best served working with a knowledgeable physician like myself throughout the testing process to avoid harm from misinterpreted test results.

I suspect that the children who are helped the most by a GFCF diet are those children who have celiac disease or gluten intolerance and reactivity to dairy products. A GFCF diet may yet be proven to help a wider group the autistic population and I strongly support further research. For now, it seems reasonable to begin with a test for celiac disease.

If this test is negative, expand testing to either stool antigens to gluten and dairy, and consider genetic testing. Individuals who test positive on any of these lab tests are probably more likely to be helped by a GFCF diet and should consider it more strongly than those who do not test positive.
Before implementing the diet, it is incredibly important to consider several important factors. Adequate preparation before starting a gluten-free, casein-free diet can make the difference between success and failure!

1. Does the family have the resources to purchase foods in a gluten-free casein-free diet that are often more expensive, and are these foods readily available? If not, is a family member willing and ready to produce home-made GFCF foods and are adequate supplies available?

2. Is there a commitment by at least one family member to keep accurate daily records of food intake and behavioral change to assess the outcome of this treatment?

3. Are there clinicians such as naturopathic physicians, pediatricians and nutritionists in the family’s geographical area who might assist in systematically assessing the gluten-free casein-free diet to ensure nutritional adequacy?

4. Does the child have a limited food repertoire that, if further limited by the gluten-free casein-free diet, might result in a dangerously compromised nutrition status?

Many children with autism have restricted food repertoires and may not consume a nutritionally adequate when food choices are restricted further. I strongly recommend working with a physician like me– someone who has a strong background in nutrition, or with a nutritionist who understand the GFCF diet.

There are many support groups available for families in need. Gradual transition to the GFCF diet, and “revising” old favorites to follow the diet may helpful. It can be hard to implement the diet when there are family members who are not following the GFCF diet. Parents may need special locks for cabinets and refrigerators, carefully watch their autistic child to ensure that they are not sneaking unacceptable foods and working closely with school personnel to ensure compliance at school.

The preparation aspect is easier if the whole family is eating GFCF otherwise, the family may need to prepare two individual meals at each mealtime! Shopping takes a considerable extra effort at first, but as the main food shopper becomes adept at reading labels, will become less of an issue.

Overall, I am encouraged by the reports of autistic children who have reported improvement on the GFCF diet. It seems reasonable to continue researching this area to determine if those children who respond favorably indeed test positive for celiac, gluten intolerance and dairy intolerance. At the same time, we may find that the children who do not respond favorably are indeed not intolerant to gluten and dairy!

To avoid potential harm from unnecessary dietary restrictions, I strongly urge all parents considering the GFCF diet for their child to have laboratory testing for celiac disease and meet with a qualified health care professional before adopting the GFCF diet long-term.

Families need support to successfully implement the diet and I believe planning and education are key to long term success. This allows families to being the diet with the best possible circumstances, and will likely lead to best possible outcomes for their child.

Related reading:

Celiac Disease

Eating Gluten-Free On A Budget, Parts 1, 2 and 3

Autism: 10 Strategies for Implementing Diet Changes

If you have any questions about celiac disease, you are welcome to ask them in the comments section and they will be addressed in future articles.

Dr. Selena Eon practices in Bellevue, WA and you may contact her at
(206) 228-9537 or visit www.drselenaeon.com

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Weight Loss

There is no cheating the system. In order to lose weight, one must follow the basic laws of physiology that you must consume fewer calories than you burn each day.

Or alternatively, you must burn more calories from exercise than you consume. Addressing the underlying causes behind poor eating and lifestyle habits is the ONLY way to ensure a healthy and long-term approach to weight loss.

The best approach to weight loss emphasizes lifestyle changes that incorporate whole foods and activity. It is our belief that sustainable changes in dietary and activity patterns can lead to maintainable, long-term weight loss success.

Physical activity guidelines are recommended to complement the nutrition counseling and make this process easier and more productive.

While each person has different needs and will require a custom tailored dietary program, there are some basic concepts that are helpful for most people. A health promoting, weight control diet will be:

• HIGH in fiber-dense carbohydrates found in whole grains, beans, fresh fruits, and vegetables. Also, it is important to drink plenty of water (approximately 2 quarts per day).

MODERATE in fish and chemical-free lean meats (chicken, and turkey).

LOW in red meat, animal fats, hydrogenated oils, full-fat dairy products, pre-packaged, processed, and refined foods, sugar, alcohol, and caffeine.

General Tips
• Set a realistic weight loss goal, usually 1 to 2 pounds per week is recommended.
• Balance food intake with activity. The most successful weight loss programs combine increased activity with decreased caloric intake.

Tips to Increase the Amount of Physical Activity in a Day:
• Try some group activity classes at the local gym, fitness center, or swimming pool.
• Work out with family, friends, or neighbors. Motivation is increased with partners.
• Take a walk at lunchtime.
• Use a bike to run local errands and go for pleasure rides.
• Use the stairs instead of the elevator.
• Walk to the bus stop or work
• Park the car a few blocks away and walk.
• Dance to some favorite music at home or sign-up for a series of classes.

Tips to Reduce the Quantity of Food Eaten:
• Plan and prepare meals ahead of time.
• Identify foods that are often over consumed and set limits, or avoid.
• Identify and limit problem foods.
• Eat small, frequent meals and healthful snacks.
• Eat slowly and savor each mouthful. Allow 20-30 minutes for each meal, rest, set the fork down, and/or converse between bites. Chew the food well.
• Wait 10-15 minutes before taking a second helping.
• Serve food on a smaller plate.
• Drink two glasses of water or a cup of hot tea 30 minutes before meals to reduce appetite.
• Postpone a desired snack for at least 10 minutes. It may be helpful to take a walk, get some fresh air, drink a cup of water or tea, or take a short nap during this time.
• At restaurants eat half of the portion and take the rest home. Prepackage the food to go before starting the meal.
• Nurture with nonfood related activities, such as a hot bubble bath or a massage, developing a hobby, relaxing with a good book, or listening to some music.

Tips to Eliminate Eating Cues that Promote Overeating:
• Designate a specific place in the home to eat, preferably the kitchen or dining room. Eat snacks and meals only when sitting down at this place.
• Avoid watching TV, talking on the phone, reading, or driving while eating. This will help increase the awareness of fullness.
• Do the grocery shopping on a full stomach to decrease impulse buys.
• Create a schedule for eating. Plan meals and snacks at regular intervals, including the types of food to be eaten.
• Carry food to work or when going out, to eliminate long periods without eating.
• To prevent visual food distractions, keep all food stored in the kitchen cupboards or refrigerator, rather than out on the counter.
• Read or listen to motivational books, join a support group, or consider seeing a therapist to help with any emotional issues involving food, eating, and/or weight loss.

Diet, activity, and emotional work can provide feelings of health and wellness, which establish new patterns that support and nurture the body.

Think well! Eat well! Be well!

Related reading:

Why You Should Invest in Fitness

Are You on the Sumo Wrestler Diet?

Rock it – Pilgrim Style

How to Eat Healthy While Traveling

6 Steps to Calorie Counting in Your Kitchen

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Astragalus for Immune Support

I love the herb Atragalus membranceus because it is a wonderful immune system “shield” for the winter months.

Avoiding sick people at home, the work place, and social functions is nearly impossible during the winter months so protecting yourself with proper hand washing, and ensuring that your immune system is properly “winterized” is an easy enough thing to do.

Although these sick individuals should do us all a favor and stay home, they still for whatever reason valiantly roll in to the work place, exposing us all to the latest cough, cold or flu.

Be sure to use the root of this plant.

You can take this in capsule or tincture form, or a simple tea can be made by simmering 1 heaping tablespoon or ½ stick of the dry root per 8 oz cup of water for about 15 minutes. Astragalus tea can be added to soups, or cooked in to brown rice for an edible immune system treat. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Exercise Alone is Over-Rated

PhotobucketBy Bonnie Pfiester, Fitness Trainer

Exercise can be a lot of hard work for very little reward if you’re just relying on exercise alone to help you drop weight. At the end of the day, sometimes it can almost seem like it’s not even worth the energy.

If that time paid off on the scale, no one would complain. It’s when the scale stands still people want to give up. So how do you make it pay off for you?

I find most people beginning an exercise program don’t really change their diet as much as they rely on the exercise to do all the work. It seems to make sense. I mean, exercise is very hard – it should melt the calories away. Right? Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Weight Issues Cause People to Hide

PhotobucketBy Bonnie Pfiester, Fitness Trainer

As a fitness professional, I often feel like a Priest at confession. Over the years, I’ve heard it all. As people lose weight they begin confessing past ‘sins’. One of the most popular confessions is what people choose to avoid because of their weight.

Top on everyone’s list is taking family photos. One of the hardest things to do is to get someone who’s lost a lot of weight to come up with a “fat picture”. They all have the same response, “No one wants to get their picture taken when they’re fat.” Unfortunately, once they lose weight, they realize how much of their life was lost to just a memory.

Next on the list are weddings and reunions. Both events offer opportunities to see people you haven’t seen in a long time. If that’s not enough stress, then you add the million photographs to capture the occasion. Before you can even get home to unpack, pictures will be posted online and emailed across the country. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Heart Palpitations and Magnesium

Hi Dr. Ben,

Question:I am currently pregnant and have been experiencing heart palpitations. My midwife told me to take magnesium. I have been taking a drugstore brand of magnesium oxide 250mg pills, but I don’t think I’m absorbing as much as I should because I am still having palpitations before my next dose.

So, my question is which of your products will best suit my needs? Thanks so much for your time. I look forward to hearing from you.

Answer: Magnesium is a tricky one and companies typically use poor forms of magnesium as it is less expensive to produce. Many magnesium drugstore products contains poor ingredients. Magnesium Oxide , Cellulose Gel , Croscarmellose Sodium , Magnesium Stearate.

Magnesium Oxide is the worst form of magnesium to take as it has the least absorption. To make it worse, the magnesium is in tablet form making absorption even less.

You may consider doing a few things to enhance magnesium absorption:

  • Mag Phos 6x 1000 tab cell salt works on a more cellular level than the typical magnesium supplement. It is easiest to put 25 tablets in 1 liter of water and drink throughout the day – every day. This way you are getting water and magnesiumm – both key to proper health.
  • Low electrolytes may cause numerous symptoms and taking the full range may assist in reducing palpitations. The recommended dosage of E-Lye Electrolyte Concentrate is ½ an ounce of concentrate to 8 oz. of water, or 8 ounces into 1 gallon of water or milk. Drink an 8 oz. serving 1-2 times daily, or as directed by your physician or HCP.Add this to the 1 liter of water and drink throughout the day along with the Mag Phos cell salts making it easier for you to remember.
  • Taking additional Magnesium of one type will likely lead to diarrhea or GI upset. So it is recommend to take a product with 3 forms of magnesium in it for optimal absorption. Tri-Magnesium offers this. Recommend dose is 1-2 caps per day.
    I would use this product over the drugstore product. I would actually throw the other product  in the trash. I do not see how it can provide much benefit given the ingredients and tablet form.

These three may reduce your heart palpitations if it is due to a magnesium deficiency.

Also increase green vegetables in your diet, as the chlorophyll molecule is rich in magnesium. Read “America’s #1 American Mineral Deficiency.”

One thing to keep in mind:

Magnesium and Calcium compete with each other. So make sure you are consuming products high in Calcium – like Organic dark leafy greens and Chia Seeds. Just two ounces of Chia seeds contain 600 mg of Calcium, compared with 120 mg for milk.

If you’ve further questions, please do inquire.

Have a healthy pregnancy and enjoy your little one when they arrive :)

In health,

Dr Benjamin Lynch CEO of  www.HealthEGoods.com

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Natural Treatments for Children’s Ear Infections

Dear Dr. Ben,

QUESTION: Since becoming pregnant I have stopped nursing my 3 year old daughter. I just couldn’t do it anymore. That was about a month ago. She now has an ear infection. The first she’s ever had, which I am suspicious is a result of weaning.

I feel extremely guilty over having to wean her and this infection only makes it worse. I don’t want to put her on antibiotics as she’s never had those either. So, I need help figuring out how to get rid of this once and for all.

Thanks so much for your help. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Running Pain Free

By Bonnie Pfiester, Fitness Trainer

Some people make running look easy. Who would think such a simple task would be so difficult. I know when I started to run again, I was discouraged to discover just how challenging it was.

Not only was I unable to run very far, everything hurt. My hips hurt, my knees hurt and my pride hurt even more. If I only knew then what I know now, I would’ve prevented injury and progressed at a faster rate.

That’s why Russ Altman, Certified Personal Trainer and Running Boot Camp Coach at Longevity Max Fitness, is passionate about teaching people how to run. “People don’t pay attention to injury warning signs. They continue to run or don’t make modifications,” explains Altman.

One of the common mistakes is increasing mileage to quickly or sporadically. In addition to a good warm-up, Altman suggests only a 10-15% increase in mileage, or time, each week to prevent injury. He also recommends a day of rest between runs to allow your body to recover.

Another common mistake is not having proper footwear. Bill Urban, from the Runner’s Depot, says most people buy their running shoes too small. “When your body heats up your feet swell”, Urban explains. “There should be a full thumbnail length between the toe and the end of the shoe.” Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

How’s Your Digestion?

vegan.jpgBy Dr. Jody Stanislaw Food is one of the greatest pleasures in life. But how often do you actually think about the fact that the nutrients contained in the food you eat are what become your skin, your lungs, even your heart, and every other part of your body?! (You’ll think again the next time you reach for some chemical ridden processed food, won’t you?) And how can you make sure you’re absorbing the valuable nutrients contained in your food? By having great digestion! This means you have an easy and complete bowel movement first thing in the morning (and ideally after lunch and dinner as well…but if you at least have one every morning, you’re doing well), your belly feels comfortable after you eat without any bloating or pressure, and gas is a rare occurrence. So how do you rate? Digestive complaints (also referred to as GI complaints, which stands for gastrointestinal) are among the most common reasons Americans go to the doctor. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Superfoods! Superfoods? And Superfood Supplements?

By Dr. Jody Stanislaw, Naturopathic Physician

shutterstock_11241226Superfoods! I’m sure you’ve heard the buzz. But what exactly is the buzz all about anyway? What are superfoods? Do you really need to eat superfoods? What are the benefits? How do you choose which superfoods are best for you? Well, wonder no longer. Lets get right to the answers…

No surprise to anyone is the fact that humans today are busier and have more on their plate, so to speak, than ever before. We eat on the run, often literally standing up. We grab ready made meals as we rush to our next appointment. We finish meals in minutes, gulping down food that not only have we not been fully present for as we chew but have barely even chewed fully before swallowing. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

We would Love your Feedback! Thank You!

calendula2Hello! KitchenTableMedicine.com is expanding and we would love your input!

I am Dr. Jody, the new Director of Advertising for Kitchen Table.

In order for Dr. Nicole and other exciting new, contributing authors like myself to continue to provide you with all of the latest and greatest in natural health news and lifestyle tips, we need to expand our list of sponsors.

But before doing so, we would love your input about what type of products you would like for us to review and who your favorite companies are!

Thus, we would be full of gratitude for you to take just a minute to answer our quick and easy, 10 question reader feedback survey.

Click Here to take survey

Thank you!


Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Super Foods!

By Dr. Nicole Sundene

Introducing favorite superfoods and their recipes is an occasional feature here at the Kitchen Table. By gradually “making friends” with the most healthy foods from nature and learning how to incorporate them in to your diet you should notice a remarkable improvement in your health.

Most superfoods are simply high in anti-oxidants and thus slow down the natural destructive process of the tissues in our bodies. Eating a diet rich in antioxidants will help to prevent aging as well as a myriad of other chronic complaints and inflammation.

Other superfoods are super because they are rich in certain vitamins, minerals or other nutrients that benefit the body in a significant way.

Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Introducing Book Club Editor – Bobbie Laing

June 26, 2009 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Bobbie Laing

Hi, I’m Bobbie Laing, editor of the Kitchen Table Medicine Book Club. Each month I will be reviewing a variety of books pertaining to health, wellness, and life in general. (Check in next month to discuss: “Habit Guide” by Mike Kinnaird!)

I will be reading and reviewing non-fiction books as well as some great fiction that I believe follow the theme and genre of the Kitchen Table. In doing this, I would like to address the “whole” person, mentally, physically and spiritually.

So, we will be reading some books that address or pertain to issues from each of these categories.

There are a lot of awesome books out there and I am excited about exploring many of them with you.

Feel free to ask questions or suggest a book that you would like to share with the Book Club. At the beginning of each month, I will be posting the books that we will be covering the following month. This will give you a chance to get the book, if you would like, and read it ahead of time and plan to share your own thoughts and opinions.

I enjoy reading your comments on the reviews and would love to have some good discussions! So visit the “comment” section after each review and leave me some feedback.

Check back next week to discuss: “Habit Guide” by Mike Kinnaird

Recent Reviews

Organic Food Gardening Beginner’s Manual

Zen to Done

Panic Away

The Sensitive Chef Cookbook

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

10 Healthiest Hospitality Drinks

June 19, 2009 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Diet Tips, Kitchen Sink, Recipes

By Dr. Nicole Sundene

My Uncle Ron is a great guy, and at our last get-together he said, “You always are sharing all this wisdom from your Dad and even your brother-in-law on your blog…..don’t you have something wonderful to say about your Uncle Ron?”

Of course I have a ton of wonderful things to say about my Uncle Ron! First and foremost, anytime you go over to visit Uncle Ron he is quick to make you feel welcome by offering you a drink. He always has a great variety on hand.

In honor of Father’s Day I would like to recognize all the great father figures in my life, along with my own fabulous dad. Thank you all for being such amazing role models, and for always just being there. My Uncle Ron wins the hospitality award!

Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Next Page »