Smoothie Recipe

berriessmoothierecipe.jpgRecently someone told me that they “don’t have time to eat breakfast”.

I replied “you don’t have time to NOT eat breakfast. Not eating breakfast is killing you slowly. Your lifespan will be shortened by not taking care of yourself properly, therefore if you don’t eat breakfast you will REALLY be short on time.”

As much as some people don’t always enjoy my tongue in cheek responses to their bad cases of the “I cants”, not eating breakfast simply should just NOT even be viewed as an option.

From start to finish my smoothie recipe takes me all of 5 minutes and 38 seconds to make, including clean up time! This is the five minutes that will SAVE your entire day. Plus, all the cool kids are doing it (ie: my sister). Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

How ANYONE Can be a Naturopath in 10 Simple Steps

shutterstock_10382539By Dr. Nicole Sundene

One day a student from UW Med School followed me around on my Bastyr Internship Rounds and said, “is being a Naturopathic Doctor all about fish oil and probiotics?”

To which I responded, “pretty much.”

As much as this is a little tongue in cheek humor for my colleagues, I hope you all will be reminded of the pillars of health.

Plus I don’t have all the time in the world to nag everyone on the planet so here is how you can help Dr. Nicole on her nagging mission:

#1 Tell everyone to investigate and TREAT THE ROOT CAUSE of their health problem. Remember that “Disease is Our Teacher” and symptoms are the only way the body can send messages that something has gone haywire. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Rosemary Salmon Recipe

img_7478.jpgIf I can make this recipe, then ANYONE can make this recipe. Combining the simple whole foods ingredients of salmon with rosemary is not only great for the cardiovascular system, but memory and concentration as well.

The omega-3 oils combine nicely with the anti-oxidant and circulatory properties of the rosemary to give your brain a much needed mental boost! This is brain food at it’s finest people! Try eating this salmon for lunch to have a productive afternoon. This is the perfect recipe for someone with ADHD.

Dr. Nicole’s Rosemary Remembrance Salmon Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Fish Oil vs Flax Oil? The Great Debate

shutterstock_4806400.jpgOne of the greatest flaws in the Standard American Diet (SAD) is a lack of omega-3 fatty acids.

Repleting this deficiency typically improves memory and mental functioning as well as corrects a gamut of other annoying health problems.

The reason for this is that these essential oils are necessary for proper brain functioning, immune function, hormonal balance and skin integrity as they are the necessary building blocks for the cellular membrane of every single cell in our body. Wow just ONE thing for all SIXTY TRILLION cells in your body!

This must be pretty important then… Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Butterfish: Better than Salmon?

black codYou have probably been buying and eating salmon for years, knowing that its omega-3 fat content is nice and high to help protect you against heart disease. However, have you heard about wild Alaskan black cod (also known as sable, butterfish or bluefish)?

By my book, anything that is known as butterfish has to be good.

This fish can contain as much as 50% more omega-3 fats than salmon and has a very mild flavor (as opposed to salmon which can be too fishy for some tastes).

For anyone who is concerned about fish populations (and that should be everyone who likes to eat fish!) this is an abundant and sustainable fish because it has been well managed. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Guide to Fats & Oils

January 11, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Cholesterol, Omega-3 Oils, Recipes

PhotobucketFats & oils are made from building blocks of fatty acids. Fatty acids affect health in different ways.

Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) have healing properties that are crucial for maintaining health. There are two types of EFAs: omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. Fatty acids like the omega 3 family promote normal cell growth and function, thus helping to maintain healthy tissues and prevent degenerative disease. To maintain overall health, it is a good idea to keep the dietary intake of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in balance. This means consuming approximately 10 times more omega-6 than omega-3 fatty acids. To achieve more of a healthy balance select nutrient-dense, whole-foods high in omega 3 fats.

Monounsaturated oils are liquid at room temperature but start to solidify at refrigerator temperatures. They easily combine with oxygen in the air to become rancid; therefore it is best to store them in the refrigerator. When substituted for saturated fats in the diet, monounsaturated fats may help to reduce overall cholesterol levels.

Polyunsaturated oils or omega 6 fatty acids are liquid at room temperature and in the refrigerator. These fats are essential for health, but excessive amounts may promote inflammatory disease, cardiovascular disease, or cancer.

Saturated fats and trans-fats are the main dietary factors for raising blood cholesterol.

Saturated fats are usually solid at room temperature. When consumed in excess, foods high in saturated fat can promote inflammatory disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.

Hydrogenated fats & oils, and trans fats are a result of food manufacturing. During food processing fats may undergo a chemical process called hydrogenation that results in the formation of trans-fats. This process changes liquid oil, naturally high in unsaturated fatty acids, to a solid and more saturated form that may be as harmful to health as naturally occurring saturated fats. Many commercial products contain hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated vegetable oils – read ingredient labels on products to avoid consuming these harmful oils. Also, be aware that most restaurants and fast-food chains use hydrogenated oils in the making of fried foods.

Tips to Reduce Saturated Fat Intake:
• Limit foods high in saturated fat, trans-fat and/or cholesterol, such as full-fat milk products, fatty meats, tropical oils, partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and egg yolks.
• When consuming meat, use lean cuts and trim excess fat. Remember, lean cuts of meat still contain saturated fat even after trimming the excess. Limit portions to 3 ounces.
• Avoid consuming the skin of game birds (it is a high source of saturated fat).
• Use a fat separator (strainer) when making gravies or soup stock.
• Avoid frying or fried foods. When exposed to high heat during frying or cooking, most vegetable oils can form toxic products that can promote cell injury

Helpful Tips:
• Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables. Choose 5 or more servings per day.
• Eat a variety of whole grain products. Choose 6 or more servings per day.
• Eat fish at least twice a week, particularly fatty fish.
• Include fat-free and low-fat milk products, beans, and skinless poultry and lean meats.
• Choose fats and oils with 2 grams or less saturated fat per tablespoon, such as canola, corn, safflower, soybean and olive oils.
• Avoid processed food products that contain hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils in the list of ingredients.
• Avoid the use of hydrogenated shortenings. Choose those made from vegetable fat such as corn oil or canola oil.
• Use reduced-fat or no-fat dressings for salads, dips and marinades.
• Remember to count the “hidden fat” in bakery and snack foods as well as the fats used in cooking and on vegetables and breads.
• Remember that coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil are high in saturated fat, even though they are vegetable oils and have no cholesterol.
• Use cooking styles that add little or no fat to food, and ask to have foods cooked that way when eating out.
• Read ingredient lists and food labels carefully. Pay attention to serving sizes.

Recipe Ideas:
• Substitute fish, vegetable or fat free chicken stock for part or all of the oil in a recipe.
• Onions sautéed in their own juice and pureed with light miso can be substituted for butter or margarine on toast or bread.
• A very loose oatmeal puree (1 c of rolled oats to 4 c of water) can be substituted for milk or cream in cream soup or gravy recipes.
• 2 egg whites can be substituted for each whole egg called for in a recipe.
• Use fats and oils sparingly. And use the ones lowest in saturated fat and cholesterol for cooking, baking and in spreads.
• Broil, bake, boil, or water sauté foods instead of frying. If frying, use minimal amounts of olive or canola oil. To water sauté instead of stir frying in oil, put 1/2 to 1 cup of water or stock into a wok or skillet, and bring to a rapid boil. Quickly add vegetables and keep stirring over high heat until done.
• Try “better butter” in place of butter. Use sparingly; it still contains saturated fat.

Better Butter Recipe:
Blend 1/4 cup of softened (or warmed) butter with
1/8 to 1/4 cup of oil such as olive, canola, sunflower, safflower, or almond oil
Spice up “better butter” by adding any spice of your choice: fresh garlic, hot chili pepper, tarragon, sage, rosemary, thyme, lemon, honey, vanilla, or bitter orange oil

source: http://www.americanheart.org

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Flax Oil Recipes

January 11, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Omega-3 Oils, Recipes

PhotobucketTips for using flax seed oil:
• It should always be kept in the refrigerator in a dark bottle to maintain freshness.
• Never cook with flax oil or heat it on the stove or in the microwave. — this destroys the benefits of the oil.
• As the oil sits over time it loses its freshness, smelling and tasting stronger.

Fruit Smoothie
1/2 banana
2 ice cubes
1 cup juice (try pineapple, apple, grape, etc.)
1 tablespoon yogurt
1 tablespoon flax seed oil
Add all ingredients together in a blender and mix. Try adding protein powder, fresh or frozen berries, cherries, or whatever fruit you like. Great for breakfast or a snack.

Dill Dressing
1/3 cup minced fresh dill
1/4 cup cider vinegar or lemon juice
1 & 1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon honey or rice syrup
1/2 cup flax seed oil
In a bowl or blender mix everything except the flax oil. Trickle the oil in slowly while blending or whisking vigorously, until the dressing is thick and smooth.
Keep extra dressing refrigerated in a dark bottle for later use.
Try it over salad, grains, vegetables, fish, etc.

Ginger Dressing
3 tablespoon flax seed oil
1 to 2 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon fresh grated ginger
1 garlic clove minced
Whisk ingredients together and store in the refrigerator in a dark bottle. Great as a light dressing over lettuce, grains, vegetables, etc.

Tamari Dressing
1/4 cup flax seed oil
2 to 3 tablespoon wheat-free tamari
2 to 3 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 to 3 cloves garlic minced
Adjust the proportions to taste. For a more unique flavor add a few pinches of one or more of the following: onion powder, oregano, basil, or curry powder. Be creative.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Essential Fats

January 11, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Omega-3 Oils

PhotobucketEssential Fatty Acids (EFAs) have healing properties that are crucial for maintaining health. There are two types of EFAs: omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. The human body is not able to make these fats; therefore EFAs must be obtained from the diet. Without these fats, cells fail to grow and function normally, increasing the chance of cell abnormalities and degenerative disease.

To maintain overall health, it is a good idea to keep the dietary intake of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in balance. This means consuming approximately 10 times more omega-6 than omega-3 fatty acids. The modern diet is rich in omega-6 fatty acids. This is because most vegetable oils (corn, safflower and sunflower oils) we use today are high in omega-6 fats and low in omega-3 fats. To achieve more of a healthy balance select nutrient-dense, whole-foods high in omega 3 fats. The best sources of omega 3 fatty acids are flax seeds, flax seed oil, canola oil, English walnuts, soybeans, white-meat chicken, and fresh, cold water fish like salmon, herring, mackerel, and rainbow trout. Good sources include Littleneck clams, shrimp, Pacific oysters, and Blue crab.

Flax seeds –
• Flax seeds can be freshly ground in a coffee or spice grinder and added to nut butter for a spread on bread, added to smoothies, oatmeal, yogurt or salads. For best results, grind the flax seeds immediately prior to use to ensure freshness. The essential fatty acids (EFA) in flax seeds can be adequately protected from rancidity by storing in the refrigerator.
• Grind 1-2 tablespoons of flax seed and sprinkle it on cereal, yogurt, or on top of ice cream or other desserts — flax has a pleasant, nutty flavor.

Flax oil –
• Flax oil can be used as a spread, or used in place of or mixed with olive oil for salad dressings, in smoothies, over cooked vegetables or grains, or directly from the spoon. The recommended amount of flax oil is 1 tablespoon per day for most adults.
o Check the label for unrefined, organic, and cold pressed for the best product.
o Flax seed oil should not be used for cooking because it easily becomes oxidized and rancid if exposed to heat.
o The oil should be stored in a black, opaque bottle in the refrigerator or freezer to protect it from light and heat (flax oil will remain liquid at freezing temperatures).

Cold Water Fish –
• Include cold water fish at least 1-3 times every week. Try salmon, herring, mackerel, and rainbow trout.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Dietary Fat Balance

January 11, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Cholesterol, Omega-3 Oils

Decrease the consumption of total fat
• Saturated fat, in particular, gets converted to cholesterol and adds to blood levels.
• It is recommended to consume no more than 10% of total calories as saturated fat.
• Trans-fatty acids are also implicated in high cholesterol and associated diseases and should be avoided (sources include partially hydrogenated oils and margarine).

Decrease the consumption of cholesterol
• Research shows that in some people, reducing dietary intake of cholesterol can lower blood levels of cholesterol if an intake at or below 300mg/day is maintained.
• Increase the amount of plants and plant products you consume- fruits, vegetables, legumes, grains, seeds, and nuts. Remember, plants do not contain cholesterol.

Photobucket Increase the consumption of dietary fiber
• Fiber, especially soluble fiber, aids in the excretion of cholesterol from the body. Legumes, oat bran, oatmeal, psyllium, and apples are excellent sources of soluble fiber.

Increase Antioxidants
• Antioxidants are effective at decreasing damage from the “bad” cholesterol. Good sources include fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, green and black tea, grape juice, garlic, raw and dry roasted nuts, and onions.

Physical Activity!
• Physical activity has been proven to raise the “good” (HDL) cholesterol. This kind of cholesterol helps rid your body of excess “bad” (LDL) cholesterol. Enjoy 30–60 minutes of vigorous physical activity on most (or all) days of the week.

Therapeutic foods:
• Fiber: legumes, oat bran, oatmeal, psyllium, and apples are excellent sources of soluble fiber, which is the most beneficial kind of fiber for lowing cholesterol.
• Omega 3 Essential Fatty Acids: cold-water fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, and herring are excellent sources. Flax seeds and flax seed oil, and walnuts are good plant sources of essential fatty acids.
• Garlic has been shown to decrease cholesterol levels (both fresh and from extracts)
• Whole, raw, unsalted seeds and nuts are high in vitamins, minerals, fiber and protein. They are excellent sources of essential fatty acids. The serving size equals 3-4 tablespoons.
• Lecithin: soybeans and soy products are the best sources.
• Fish and poultry: in place of red meat and processed deli meats
• Whole grains, vegetables, and fruits
• Increase use of flavonoids from tea (especially green tea), onions and grapefruit.

source: http://www.americanheart.org

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Eat More Fat to Prevent Heart Disease?

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketThis week, I will be discussing ways in which to prevent heart disease that may be, if not outright surprising, then at least somewhat intriguing.
The first surprising way to prevent heart disease is to eat more fat. So, I know what you are thinking, Wow! Are you telling me that I can go out and eat Big Macs and candy bars to my heart’s content???

Of course not…let’s have some common sense. What I am saying is that the more omega-3 fats you eat, the better it is for your heart. These fats are anti-inflammatory and inflammation has been shown to be a crucial step in developing plaque and heart disease.

Omega-3 fats are most commonly known to be found in fish, such as salmon, black cod or sablefish, and halibut. They are also found in foods like flaxseeds and walnuts. However, these vegetarian sources are made up of a slightly different type of omega-3 fat that your body has a harder time converting to the kind that it needs. In fact, research has not shown the same kinds of results from flaxseeds and walnuts as they have from fish.

So, eat your fish and love the fat because it loves you!

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

How to Stop Burping Up Fish Oil

December 9, 2007 by Dr. Nicole Sundene  
Filed under Omega-3 Oils

PhotobucketMost folks have heard of the health benefits of the Omega 3 oils found primarily in Alaskan Wild Salmon and flaxseeds.

Although dietary consumption is always preferred it may not be practical for those with high Omega 3 intake requirements such as those with inflammatory conditions.

If you have a problem taking the fish oil capsules you can simply keep them in the freezer! The capsule should then stay intact while passing through the stomach and break down in the small intestine instead for absorption.

Fish oil should be taken with a meal, not on an empty stomach. Be sure to use a high quality fish oil that has been independently quality tested for Mercury and PCB content.

You can evaluate the research at www.consumerlabs.com to find high quality supplements. Carlson is a highly reputable company and is widely available, I also like Arctic Omega, and Pharmax.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™