Smoothie Recipe

berriessmoothierecipe.jpgRecently someone told me that they “don’t have time to eat breakfast”.

I replied “you don’t have time to NOT eat breakfast. Not eating breakfast is killing you slowly. Your lifespan will be shortened by not taking care of yourself properly, therefore if you don’t eat breakfast you will REALLY be short on time.”

As much as some people don’t always enjoy my tongue in cheek responses to their bad cases of the “I cants”, not eating breakfast simply should just NOT even be viewed as an option.

From start to finish my smoothie recipe takes me all of 5 minutes and 38 seconds to make, including clean up time! This is the five minutes that will SAVE your entire day. Plus, all the cool kids are doing it (ie: my sister). Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Immune Support Breakfast

PhotobucketThis is intended to be used to strengthen the Immune System and is not designed to be hypoallergenic. Modify as needed for your personal dietary needs.

4 cups Rolled Grains

Begin by using the following proportions, adjust as necessary: 2 cups rolled oats (flakes); use 4 cups if other grains are unavailable. 2 cups other rolled grains; i.e. rye, barley, and/or rolled rice flakes.

2 cups Oat Bran

1/2 cup Fresh/Dried Fruit/Seeds
Raisins, dates, blueberries, etc. (unsulphered only)

1 cup Sunflower Seeds and/or Pumpkin seeds (can be ground)

1 cup Nuts
Begin with walnuts and almonds

1 cup Lecithin Granules

1 cup Ground Flax Seed

1 cup Milk Thistle (Silybum Marianum Seeds)

1/2 cup Chia Seeds (Optional)

Spices Try coriander, fennel, and/or turmeric. Begin with 1 tsp. of each. Experiment with ginger, cinnamon and other herbs/spices.

• Grind flax seeds and milk thistle seeds (available at health food stores) in a coffee grinder, blender, or meat grinder. Next, combine all ingredients and keep in refrigerator.
• Soak for 30 minutes or longer before eating (i.e. overnight). Use water, nutmilk, rice milk, apple juice, etc.
• To make almond milk, blend 1/2 cup almonds with 2 cups water in a blender.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Sunshine Carrots with Basil

December 5, 2010 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Kitchen Sink, Recipes

PhotobucketA great classic.  With cooler days upon us, serve this as a side dish that will warm you up and tantalize your taste buds.

Ingredients

  • 5 med. carrots
  • 1 tbsp. turbinado sugar
  • 1 tsp. organic cornstarch
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/4 tsp. ginger
  • 1/8 Tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 Tsp. basil
  • 1/4 c. orange juice, freshly squeezed
  • 2 tbsp. organic butter

Method

  1. Cut carrots however you prefer.
  2. Boil in water for about 10 minutes or until almost tender.
  3. Meanwhile combine sugar, cornstarch, salt, basil, cinnamon and ginger in a small saucepan.
  4. Add orange juice; cook, stirring constantly until thick and bubbly.
  5. Boil 1 minute. Add butter.
  6. Pour over drained carrots.
  7. Toss and serve.
  8. Enjoy!

Zesty Tip: When cooking any root vegetable that you will later add a sauce too – make sure to slightly undercook your vegetables as they will continue to cook in the sauce.  To stop the cooking process after boiling them or steaming them – you can shock them in ice water.

For more simple, easy and healthy recipes, head over and check out zestycook.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Aunt Sally’s $10,000 Chicken Recipe Gets a Makeover

My Aunt Sally won $10,000 for this recipe, plus it is lowfat, simple, and delicious!

This is my slightly healthier spin on it as I use olive oil instead of butter, brown rice instead of white, and lowfat sour cream rather than full fat.

Preparation:

  • Rinse and trim fat off four boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • Marinate for at least 30 minutes (recipe below)
  • Heat skillet over medium high heat, then add 1-2 tablespoons olive or canola oil.
  • Sear chicken breasts on medium high heat for a few seconds on each side, and reduce heat to medium or medium low depending on your stove. Read more
Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

10 Healthiest Hospitality Drinks

June 19, 2009 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Diet Tips, Kitchen Sink, Recipes

By Dr. Nicole Sundene

My Uncle Ron is a great guy, and at our last get-together he said, “You always are sharing all this wisdom from your Dad and even your brother-in-law on your blog…..don’t you have something wonderful to say about your Uncle Ron?”

Of course I have a ton of wonderful things to say about my Uncle Ron! First and foremost, anytime you go over to visit Uncle Ron he is quick to make you feel welcome by offering you a drink. He always has a great variety on hand.

In honor of Father’s Day I would like to recognize all the great father figures in my life, along with my own fabulous dad. Thank you all for being such amazing role models, and for always just being there. My Uncle Ron wins the hospitality award!

Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

The Sensitive Chef Cookbook

PhotobucketBy Bobbie Laing

Living with food allergies can be a frustrating way of life for many people.

In our world of instant everything, from Hamburger Helper to that pre-seasoned chicken that looks so tempting in the frozen isle of the grocery store, it is harder than ever to make healthy choices for our families.

Much less having to factor in what allergens may be lurking inside these foods.

The author’s own experience with severe food allergies and sensitivities, as well as having a daughter with Celiac Disease, led her on this quest to find food that was not just safe for herself and her family, but also delicious.

In the book are everyday recipes, as well as ideas for food on the go when traveling or dining out. She also gives valuable tips on how you may be able to continue to dine at some of your favorite restaurants.

In the introduction to the book, author Sharon D. Morse tells of her sudden and nearly fatal experience with a severe allergic reaction to a tree nut:

A few years ago, I nearly died from anaphylactic shock after ingesting a small piece of a tree nut. That reaction triggered many underlying sensitivities and allergies. I became sensitive to many foods and anaphylactic to peanuts, tree nuts, and other common allergens. Needless to say, I had a long road ahead of me in just trying to figure out what I could and couldn’t eat. After several accidental anaphylactic reactions, I had to be very careful and not take ANY chances with my choice of sustenance.

I have literally spent countless hours in the kitchen, pondering over recipes, creating new recipes, and doing research on food allergies and sensitivities. After hundreds of hours of testing and retesting to make delightfully tasty recipes, it is really a delight to me to make available The Sensitive Chef cookbook.

In The Sensitive Chef Cookbook, you will find delicious alternatives for many of your favorite dishes. This book is a great resource for people with food allergies and other disorders that require that they eliminate many common foods and ingredients from their diet.

The book contains over 100 recipes that are Wheat-Free, Gluten-Free, Nut-Free, and Shellfish-Free, that outshine the competitors with dishes that are even better than their original counterparts.

The recipes include delicious entrees such as Chicken Enchilada Pie, Beefy Stew, and Luscious Lasagna.

Just to name a few! In addition to these, there are some wonderful looking quick breads & muffins, yeast breads, desserts, cookies, & candies as well as Vegetarian recipes like Chow Down Chili Burgers, Hearty Chili Con Queso, Super Beans, and Fresh (Raw) Pasta Sauce.

No matter what allergic or sensitivity issues you face, eating healthy, safe, and delicious food is important to you and your family. Books like The Sensitive Chef Cookbook can make that challenge a little easier.

Contact us if you would like your book considered for our book club.

Also check out our Amazon bookstore for more fantastic healthy book recommendations!

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Flatiron Grilled Asian Marinade Recipe

February 9, 2009 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Recipes

PhotobucketGet to the grill with this tasty recipe from LaCense Beef!

The flatiron is a great steak to grill. I like to grill over a very high heat, keep the meat rare on the inside and really enjoy the flavor of the beef with this touch of Asian flavoring.

My kids couldn’t get enough of it and clamored for more. The marinade can be used more than once before discarding. There is plenty of flavor packed in that liquid. Serve it draped over a pile of sautéed Chinese broccoli or spinach.

  • 2 flatiron steaks thawed slowly in the refrigerator
  • 6 scallions
  • 1/3 c soy sauce
  • 1/3 c water
  • juice of 1 orange
  • 1 T honey
  • 1 clove garlic crushed and sliced
  • 1/2” inch of ginger crushed and chopped
  • 1/4 t chili flakes
  • 1 star anise wheel crushed

Combine all the ingredients.

If the honey is too cold to dissolve, warm gently over the stove until dissolved. Do not cook. Place the steaks in the marinade and allow them to rest at room temperature for at least 1 hour and not more than 4 hours. Put the scallions in the marinade as well for about 1 hour. Grill over a hot fire searing the outside and maintaining a rare interior.

Grill the scallions as well after the steaks have cooked over a less intense heat. Let the meat rest before slicing. Slice and drape over greens that have been sautéed in olive oil with garlic and a bit of ginger. Salt to taste. Cut the scallions into 2 inch long sections and make a pile on top of the meat. Yum.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Have a Fabulous Super Bowl Party With Mouth-Watering Ribs

January 30, 2009 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Recipes

Are you having a Super Bowl party, but want to try something besides the same-old, same-old chicken wings?

Try this recipe from La Cense Beef and treat your guests to some mouth-watering short ribs. Want your feast to be even better? Make sure you use grass-fed beef!

Beef Short Ribs with Tomatoes Smoked Peppers and Oregano

2lbs bone in short ribs salted overnight
1 large onion
6 garlic cloves
3 large tomatoes cut in chunks
4 sprigs of oregano or 2 t. dried
1-2 canned chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (use 2 if you really like a kick)

  1. In a large cast iron pot or casserole, heat some olive oil and brown the short ribs on all sides.
  2. Remove the meat.
  3. Add more oil if necessary and sauté the onions and garlic.
  4. When softened, add the tomatoes. They will give off some juice.
  5. Cook off some of that water then add the oregano and the chipotles. Salt the stew lightly. Add the meat back into the pot.
  6. Cover and simmer for about 2 hours either on top of the stove on a low heat or in the oven at 325. It should be loose when you pass a knife through it. Remove the meat. Skim off any fat that is on top of the sauce and reduce further if necessary. It should be a chunky consistency. Serve with soft polenta or mashed potatoes laying the meat down on the starch and then spooning all the sauce over everything.

Enjoy!

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Japanese Prawn and Noodle Salad Recipe

PhotobucketPrawns are a delicious, healthy light protein choice.

Try pairing them with veggies for lunch and keep the carbs “slow” for optimal energy at the office or while chasing kids around all day.

Today’s healthy recipe is brought to us by my friend Zesty of ZestyCook.com. Visit his website for more whole food recipe ideas.

Ingredients

  • 150 g Japanese noodles or Chinese
  • 6 Cups Mixed Greens
  • 2 Cloves garlic; crushed
  • 1 Red pepper; deseeded and cut into thin strips
  • 4 tb Brown rice vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp. Coconut Milk
  • 1 Tbsp. Fresh root ginger grated
  • 2 Tbsp. Soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp. Sesame seeds toasted (1oz)
  • 2 tb Sunflower oil
  • 1 Lb. Prawns

Method

  1. Place the cooked drained noodles in a salad dish and chill.
  2. In a small bowl add the the rice vinegar and soy sauce. Leave for 10 minutes.
  3. Heat the sunflower oil in a wok and add the crushed garlic,stir fry for 1-2 minutes and add the red pepper.
  4. Add Prawns to the hot pan and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add coconut milk and allow to thicken. Then cool slightly.
  6. Combine the vegetables with the noodles and add the rice vinegar and soy sauce directly to noodles. Take the grated ginger and holding in one hand squeeze the juice over the salad and discard the pulp.
  7. Chill for 30 minutes before serving.
  8. Toss with mixed greens.

Delicious served as a light lunch or as part of an oriental meal.

Zesty Tip: When dressing a salad, place the dressing in the bottom of the bowl and the greens on top of them and gently toss with a pair of tongs just before serving. This will prevent damaging the greens.

More Zesty Recipes:
The Healing Power of Cauliflower
Sauteed Spinach Recipe

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Recipe: Organic Sports Drinks

sportsdrinks.jpgMost sports drinks are just pollutionfests chock full of Kitchen Table Villains such as High Fructose Corn Syrup, food colorings, additives, preservatives, and artificial flavorings and colorings. With just a few simple kitchen ingredients, you can make your own homemade sports drinks.

The two widely available sports drinks I commonly recommend for athletes and those that are at risk of dehydration are Emergen-C and Recharge.

If you do not have these readily on hand, you can also easily make your own sports drinks at home.

Making your own sports drinks is fun, cost effective, and MUCH healthier than most alternatives.

Ingredients for Homemade Organic Sports Drinks:

  • Pure Organic Fruit Juice (No High Fructose Corn Syrup!)
  • Water or Green Tea
  • Organic Sea Salt

Directions: Fill your sports bottle with half juice and half water. Add a pinch of organic sea salt, shake, and enjoy!

Sports Drink Variations and Information:

  • You can use table salt, but organic sea salt is best to use as an electrolyte source as the minerals of the sea are very similar to our own electrolyte composition in our blood. Sea salt contains 84 minerals. Aside from sodium, you are receiving potassium, iodine, magnesium, calcium, zinc, manganese, and more!
  • A small pinch of sea salt is sufficient for most, a larger pinch should be used for endurance athletes, and convalescent care to stave off hyponatremia, the dangerous condition of low sodium levels that can cause muscle weakness, confusion, slurred speech, and more.
  • The RDA for sodium depending on your age, ranges between 1200-1500mg daily.
  • Most athletes lose around 1000mg of sodium per hour, depending on how much they sweat, you do not have to replete all of this at once though, doing so may result in gastrointestinal distress such as nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.
  • Most sports drinks contain around 20-60mg of sodium per 100 mL.
  • One teaspoon of salt contains 2400mg of sodium. For hard core endurance athletes such as Ironman triathletes, that are in need of strict sodium regulation, I would aim for about 1/8 of a teaspoon of salt an hour for starters. If you get cramps or weakness in your muscles then you probably need more sodium and magnesium. If you get an upset stomach, chances are you need less sugar and electrolytes. These are just basic guidelines, the best formula is the one that works for you!
  • Soups like chicken and vegetable broth can also be enjoyed as electrolyte sources.
  • Green tea can be used for athletes wanting a little bit of a fat burning or energetic edge.
  • Honey and sea salt can be added to green tea or your favorite herbal tea if fruit juice is unavailable. Enjoy hot or chilled.
  • Try adding an Emergen-C packet to your room temperature green tea for an energizing, fat burning sports drink! Let the tea cool a bit because vitamin C is heat sensitive.
  • Herbal teas can also be used in this formula as a simple way to deliver herbal medicine to sick children.
  • Hydrating foods such as watermelon, cucumbers, honeydew, cantaloupe, and other such water packed fruits and vegetables are also excellent sources of water, sugar, and electrolytes. They are “Nature’s Sports Drinks”! Keep them in your refrigerator and serve them up cold to kids that have been actively playing in the warm summer sun.

Reference: Exercise Associated Hyponatremia, Cape Town, South Africa 2005. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. 15(4):208-213, July 2005.

Enjoy, and thanks for stopping by my kitchen table!

~Dr. Nicole

Naturopathic Physician

www.KitchenTableMedicine.com

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

The Healing Power of Thanksgiving

Photobucket

Contrary to popular belief Thanksgiving Dinner is actually quite healthy.

When we remove all the notorious “white foods,” such as white refined flours, sugars, and other carbohydrates devoid of nutrients we are actually left with a very colorful whole food fare.

Of course you should never try a new recipe while entertaining, but I have given each popular dish a “whole foods makeover” so that you can try a healthier option next time. There should be a next time–in just a few weeks. We should try to eat a turkey dinner more than once a year! Baking a whole turkey is a fantastic healthy and frugal way to optimize your grocery budget, and turkey is the hottest trend this winter. Plus it just makes the house smell good. I freeze carcasses until I have enough to make into a great turkey wild rice soup.

Here are the top eight superfoods found in our traditional American Thanksgiving spread.

1. Turkey

Renowned for its high tryptophan content, turkey has the potential to lift our mood and/or make us sleepy. It really depends on how we choose to pair up the amino acids in turkey. When turkey is consumed in conjunction with refined carbohydrates found in mashed potatoes or dinner rolls, the tryptophan converts to serotonin, and in low light conditions the excess serotonin converts in to melatonin, the nighttime hormone that makes us feel sleepy. Serotonin gives you that good “Turkey Buzz” and Melatonin is what sends you straight to the couch for a nice nap. If you are depressed you should work turkey, cottage cheese, and salmon in to your weekly rotation so you can benefit from my other favorite high tryptophan foods, or you can also just try some 5-HTP.

When we eat turkey in the absence of carbohydrates the amino acids that increase energizing catecholamines are able to cross the blood brain barrier and the result is an energized good mood. If you aren’t a breakfast person try a bit of salmon, cottage cheese, or turkey to start your day, support your adrenal glands, and keep you energized until lunch.

Turkey Makeover: Hold the butter, skip the stuffing and go straight for olive oil and lemon as your poultry flavorings of choice. If you bake your turkey at 320F you will be well below the smoking point of olive oil.

Stuffing the cavity of the turkey with whole lemon halves will also give the turkey a “salty flavor” so you can use the least amount of organic sea salt necessary. Stuff some garlic cloves and thyme under the skin of the turkey, and in the cavity along with the lemons.

Medical geeks like me can get crafty and inject herbal seasonings mixed with your basting solution of olive oil and lemon straight in to the meat with syringes (yes you can buy meat syringes at the store too.) Then just baste and bake as usual. Salt and pepper your turkey mainly on your dinner plate, not in the oven. Salt always loses flavor as it cooks and the best flavor comes from that final sprinkling. Salting your meat while cooking also dries it out, so really it is not just healthy but smart.


To benefit from the tryptophan in turkey don’t over do it with your carbs….that is unless you are heading straight to bed! To boost your mood opt to pair your turkey with the “slow carbs” found in fruits and veggies. Skip the dinner roll and the mound of mashed potatoes.

If you are adventurous, you can also go outside for a little walk after you eat your turkey to stay energized. The full spectrum light will prevent the melatonin formation that makes us all so sleepy.

The moral of the turkey story is that tryptophan converts to serotonin which makes us happy, and in the presence of excess dietary sugar and darkness serotonin converts to melatonin, and melatonin makes us drowsy. That is why all of us in Seattle are so darn tired all the time and left with no choice but to hang out at Starbucks or stare at a light box.

Got that? Fabulous. Moving on.

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2. Thyme

Did you ever wonder where that traditional flavor of Thanksgiving came from? You may not know if you haven’t ever prepared the meal. That certain flavor comes from the herb thyme that we traditionally use to flavor our stuffing. Thyme is a fantastic healing herb as it is antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal just like most of it’s relatives in the “laminacea” or mint family.

Thyme is used in making “Listerine” mouthwash, or at least it traditionally was. The aromatic oils in thyme are also fantastic for indigestion, no wonder this is the key point herbal medicine of our great American overeating day!

Stuffing Makeover: Just lose the stuffing! Stuffing although delicious is one of the biggest calorie mongers on the menu. If this is your favorite thing you will need to cut back somewhere else on your plate. The trend of white bread went out with eating McInflammation. The new America is a whole foods America.

Whatever you do, please don’t bake your stuffing inside the turkey, this makes it that much more fattening, and sets people up for food poisoning if not adequately cooked through. You HAVE to check the temperature of your stuffing AND your turkey.

Instead try a stuffing in your crockpot of brown rice or quinoa, thyme, raw nuts and seeds, dried fruit, garlic, and your favorite stuffing spices instead of the traditional white food fest. At least experiment with healthy stuffing alternatives for your non-holiday feasts. I will allow everyone to eat stuffing one day a year on my whole foods diet. If you can “just say no to stuffing” then you get bonus points and will immediately benefit by feeling good about yourself and not overstuffed from stuffing.

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3. Cranberries

Delicious and healthy antioxidant rich fruit that fight aging, inflammation, and bladder infections.

Why are berries all the latest rage? In my Mangosteen Scam tirade I discussed that all deeply pigmented fruit skins are high in antioxidants. From a botanical standpoint the plant smartly creates these antioxidant polyphenols known as “proanthocyanins” to protect the skin of the fruit from the sun. The fruit cannot use sunlight to produce energy in the manner that the leaves of the plant do, so the antioxidants are “nature’s sunscreen”. Without their protective antioxidants, berries would shrivel and burn under the sun’s harsh rays.

The ingenious antioxidant protection devised by the plant also kindly protects us from the free radical damage that results from the reactive oxygen species we are constantly exposed to in our polluted stressful environment. The skin, eyes, and blood vessels are especially protected by the proanthocyanins in berries.

Most people know that cranberry juice is good for bladder infections. E. coli, the bacteria that causes most bladder infections is unable to adhere to the lining of the bladder thanks to cranberry.

What most people don’t know though is that there is not a therapeutic cranberry juice out there that really tastes that good! If you are drinking a “delicious” glass of cranberry juice every day then you are probably not doing much to prevent a bladder infection. You should read the label because you are probably drinking a delicious glass of high fructose corn syrup(HFCS) and food coloring.


When shopping for cranberry juice, be sure to read the label and purchase only 100% pure cranberry juice. The HFCS juice trend faded out in the nineties. And a cranberry juice loaded with grape juice, apple juice or heaven forbid high fructose corn syrup is simply not going to be effective for preventing disease or bladder infections. To make cranberry juice more palatable, mix with 50% pure blueberry juice. Blueberries are also fantastic antioxidants that prevent bladder infections and aging.

Cranberry Sauce Makeover: Try experimenting with healthier natural sweeteners like agave, brown rice syrup, and stevia for homemade cranberry sauce. Adding a bunch of refined sugars and other refined pollutants to cranberries defeats their protective healing purpose.

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4. Yams

Because of the beautiful orange and yellow pigments, yams, sweet potatoes, and even that delicious pumpkin pie are all a rich source of beta carotene and other important carotenoids that prevent cancer and support a healthy immune system.

Yellow and orange foods are particularly protective to the lungs, reproductive system, and eyes.

No, carrots probably don’t improve your vision, but the carotenoids in them have been shown to be protective and preventative for both cataracts and macular degeneration. So they may not perfect your vision, but they will prevent its degeneration. Certain antioxidants have affiliations for certain tissues in our systems. Be sure to eat something yellow and orange every day, and I’m not talking about circus peanuts! Eating by the rainbow is the diet for the new millennium. If you are struggling with this new trend you may need to grab my favorite Whole Foods Multi that just happens to be “Buy One Get One Free” right now.

Yam Makeover: Lose the marshmallows! Marshmallows are completely out of style. Less is more now. “More is more” went out five years ago, and for some of us a few months ago when the stock market crashed. Try your traditional whipped yam recipe without the marshmallows. Garnish with pecans instead, or just let them stand alone as the amazing super food they are. Try healthier sweeteners in your candied yam recipe like brown rice syrup, agave, or stevia and flavor with cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, or pumpkin pie spice.

Baked yams as pictured are delicious and simple! Try roasting yams in the oven at 350F 30-40 minutes until fork tender. You can also steam yams till tender, drizzle with olive oil and give a sprinkle of sea salt for a regular dinner side dish. The peel of vegetables is where all the nutrients and fiber lies. Buy yams organic if you are going to eat the peel since they are a root vegetable. All root vegetables are naturally riddled with pesticides as they absorb and concentrate them from the soil. But, since yams and sweet potatoes are dirt cheap, they are worth the extra splurge. Everyone that is “cool now” is eating yams and sweet potatoes, so hopefully that includes you.

For a healthy wheat free “sweet potato pie” scoop out freshly baked sweet potato just like what is pictured here, sprinkle with pumpkin pie spice, drizzle with honey, and top with shredded coconut! Without the pie crust you have earned the calories to add a small dollop of your favorite organic vanilla ice cream. It sounds weird, but it is truly delicious. Who has the time to bake an entire pie anyways when you can just toss a couple sweet potatoes in the oven? Isn’t healthy easy? That is why it is so stylish.

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5. Green Beans

Green beans are loaded with fiber, beta carotene, B-vitamins, calcium, and potassium. Eating any beans are a fantastic diabetic trick for lowering the glycemic load of a meal. Beans truly are the “magical fruit” for a reason. Now eating too many beans may not make you too popular, but at least they will make you more attractive and youthful and trim your waist line.

Green Bean Makeover: Lightly steam your green beans, they are done when they turn bright green, don’t boil them in to a nutrient devoid lifeless brown mess. We just don’t boil vegetables anymore. If you boil them you should drink the water too as that is where all the vitamins go. It is just wrong on so many levels, and the kind of thing that only belongs in the “worse dressed” section of the tabloids. Canned green beans went out with acid washed jeans. Always opt for fresh or frozen before grabbing for cans.

I don’t mean to sound bossy, but you have to lose the white canned cream of mushroom soup garbage, and dress your beans with olive oil or your favorite olive oil based salad dressing. If you have to defy me and use a cream based soup then grab an organic one, as most cheap soups are the worst of the worst processed food fests.

Now add carmelized REAL onions, not those fake canned crunchies that were SO 1981. It is important that you keep up with the latest trends. Almond slivers should be RAW to maximally benefit from the cancer fighting phenolic acids and healthy fats, and of course that also is the stylish thing that everyone else is doing. Especially celebrities. This is how celebrities eat on their “designer diets” so if you want to send me a thank you check you are welcome to make a donation.

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6. Mashed Potatoes

If you keep the peel on the potatoes before you mash them, then I will give you permission to eat them.

Potatoes get a bad wrap because we don’t eat the peel. Buy organic potatoes and mash them WHOLE. The peel of the potato contains fiber, vitamin C, thiamin, and potassium.

Some people with arthritis don’t tolerate potatoes well, if you have arthritis, potatoes and foods in the solonacea family like eggplant, peppers, onions, and so forth just may not be the right choice for you.

Mashed Potato Makeover: There are a few great makeover tricks you can implement to freshen up a rather dead ugly lifeless food like mashed potatoes. Definitely stand by ready and loaded with your garlic press and press about a clove per large potato. Garlic supports the immune and cardiovascular systems. Garlic also prevents and kills parasites.

I always add cottage cheese to my mashed potatoes to give them that creamy consistency, this protein bump also decreases the glycemic load for dieters, and diabetics. Cottage is also rich in mood boosting tryptophan. Remember we have to eat protein, and fiber with EVERY meal to prevent diabetes, blood sugar crashes from hypoglycemia, and obesity. Plus all the cool kids are doing it.

Try olive oil instead of butter, try adding some steamed arugula or spinach in at the end to create a gourmet effect, and if you HAVE to have that buttery flavor from organic butter (please don’t EVER use margarine if you learn anything from my nags. Please just go throw out your tub of margarine in the garbage where it belongs, and never buy it again, or any other hydrogenated oil product that serves no other biochemical purpose in life but to rapidly age you, clog your arteries, and make you unnecessarily fat. We want to be the least amount of fat right? Your body can’t use margarine so it converts it to fat storage…) just add some low fat buttermilk in lieu of regular milk if you must do dairy and NEED that butter flavor. Sprinkle with sea salt and organic pepper. Enjoy!

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7. Minced Meat Pie

Are you terrified of minced meat pie? Well most of us are, until we discover that modern “minced meat” is just a fruit sauce made of dates and other dried fruits and not some leftover cafeteria meat concoction.

Well the beauty of this is that dates, figs, prunes, apples, and most dried fruits score high on the ORAC, meaning they have extremely high free radical fighting potential. Antioxidants=Anti-aging. Memorize that. Aging isn’t just about vanity and outer appearance. Your organs and blood vessels are aging on the inside as we sit here. If it doesn’t look good on the outside it doesn’t look good on the inside either. True beauty is an inside out job. Eat more antioxidants to prevent disease and you will be rewarded with a continuously youthful glow.

Let me be the first to announce that Minced Meat Pies are now the HOTTEST trend for fall. Don’t worry they only show up on the whole foods runway once every 50 years.

Minced Meat Makeover: Opt for a whole grain crust and use organic butter rather than margarine (heaven forbid.) If you really want to impress those avoiding gluten with your gourmet skills, you can add a dollop of your favorite organic minced meat filling to half a sliced date and top with a splash of real whipped cream. Dates are also delicious stuffed with various nut butters, and chocolates as I just recently learned from RN, Rod Newbound.
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8. Red Wine

“Yes! Dr. Nicole says I can have a glass of red wine!” Just remember that is only ONE to two glasses of red wine–max. That is one drink per day not per hour–and no you can’t save them all up for the end of the week. It just doesn’t work that way. The benefits of the cancer fighting, anti-aging polyphenols in red wine known as resveratol go down as you burden your liver with alcohol. As with everything, moderation is key. Even too much water will kill cause hyponatremia and kill you.

Red Wine Makeover: Remember that one glass is better for you than the entire bottle. Opt for an organic alternative like our Kitchen Table 2008 Favorite, Badger Mountain. Remember to never drive while you are drinking. The most stylish people always have a driver…er…cab driver. Even one glass of alcohol impairs your judgment enough to put an end to your happy holiday–or worse yet–someone else’s.

Please always be considerate to the safety of others when imbibing during the holiday season.

Hope you all have a Happy AND Healthy Thanksgiving! Have fun wowing all your friends and family with this questionably boring kitchen table talk of the Thanksgiving superfoods and how to give them makeovers. Let me know if you manage to pull it off and keep them interested! Feel free to share any of your healthy Thanksgiving recipe tips in the comments section.

Thanks much for sharing my whole foods tips with your friends and family.

~Dr. Nicole Sundene
Naturopathic Physician

References: Medical Nutrition from Marz by Dr. Russell Marz, Medical Herbalism by Hoffman

Related Reading:

The Healing Power of Cauliflower
The Healing Power of Music
The Healing Power of Positivity
The Healing Power of Mexican Food
The Healing Power of Stinging Nettles

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

The Healing Power of Cauliflower

Cauliflower is an especially healing autumn food because it is low in calories, high in fiber, and rich in a very special cancer fighting compound called indole-3-carbinol.

This magical component of cauliflower prevents cancer by detoxing the system of the harmful forms of estrogen that result in reproductive cancers and complaints in women.

Researchers are now thinking men can likely use indole-3-carbinol to prevent forms of reproductive cancer, hair loss, and erectile dysfunction that result from these elevated levels of toxic estrogen. The high antioxidant spices added to your favorite cauliflower recipe combined with the olive oil further prevent cancer and reduce inflammation. This side dish will pair well with your favorite chicken, safe seafood, or grassfed beef recipe.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Sauteed Spinach Recipe

Today’s featured healing recipe is provided by ZestyCook.com!

Spinach is an especially healing food as it is rich in folic acid and beta carotene.

The root of folic acid comes from “foilage” and leafy greens are chock full of this nutrient shown to prevent cervical cancer and birth defects.

Folic acid also has been shown in research to make anti-depressants more effective. You will also be happy to know that it is OK to eat a little bit of fat with your vegetables. Fats paired with veggies help us better absorb the fat soluble vitamins they contain. Those on the Mediterranean Diet or Anti-Inflammatory Diet can substitute the low fat cream for olive oil.

Zesty has provides us with a SIMPLE five minute spinach side dish packed with flavour. Give this a try – you will be very glad you did! Feel free to get creative and substitute your favorite seasonal greens: Bok Choy, Swiss Chard, and Kale are also excellent healing choices.

Sauteed Spinach

Ingredients:

  • 4 Cups Spinach
  • 1/4 Cup Low fat Cream
  • 2 cloves Garlic crushed and made into paste
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4 cup pine nuts
  • Handful of chopped Fresh Basil
  • Organic sea salt

Directions:

  1. Preheat pan and add olive oil.
  2. Add spinach and allow to wilt down. Stirring for 1 minute.
  3. Add garlic, cayenne, black pepper. Stir for 2 minutes
  4. Add Low fat cream
  5. Top with Pine nuts and fresh basil

Zesty Tip: To make garlic paste, add a bit of organic sea salt to your cutting board and crush the clove of garlic on top. Then using your knife to smear the garlic back and forth into the salt mixture. The salt will help form a paste and you are ready to go.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Dairy Free Latte Recipe

Perfect Dairy Free Latte Recipe

  • 2 shots of organic espresso
  • 1 cup heated vanilla (or chocolate) Almond Breeze
  • Pour in a large mug and enjoy!

Calories: 110

Okay you caught me. I drink coffee. Feel free to report me to the naturopathic police, but I do drink coffee moderately, which means less than every single day, and it is typically organic coffee, as non-organic coffee is likely dirtier than any of the top foods on the notorious “Dirty Dozen”….if I must defend myself. *sigh*

The key to enjoying the occasional vice is enjoying it THOROUGHLY, and in moderation of course. When you actively enjoy it, without all the guilt, you will be less likely to miss it. Also, when we give our favorite vices naturopathic makeovers, we lesson the total load of toxins placed upon the system.

If you have the habit of frequenting your local coffee shop, you will likely save money by purchasing a nice espresso machine and grinding your own organic coffee beans at home.

Everybody raves over my latte recipe, and the secret behind it is actually quite simple. I use vanilla flavored almond milk. From my experiment for the “The Best Non-Dairy Milks”, I have found Almond Breeze brand to be the most delicious. Almond milk has a thicker consistency than rice milk or cow milk. Almond milk is also great for those that are sensitive or allergic to soy as soy is one of the top seven food allergens.

Remember when drinking coffee to also avoid the excessive use of sweeteners and artificial creamers as they are typically full of “Kitchen Table Villains” and not part of our mission here of eating a “Whole Foods Diet”.

If coffee is a daily habit for you, consider cleaning up your daily vice and going organic.

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen table!

~Dr. Nicole

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Heart Healthy Herbal Cocktail

pomegranategreentea.jpgBy Dr. Nicole Sundene

With the hot summer months upon us (well not so much in Seattle today), I thought I would share my favorite herbal iced tea recipe to help you “Unleash your inner fabulosity”.

Mixing fat burning green tea with pomegranate juice is a most delicious delivery system for the heart healthy antioxidants, proanthocyanins, bioflavonoids, and polyphenols that protect our cardiovascular systems from the ravages of inflammation.

Ultimately these gifts from nature work synergistically to preventing heart disease and aging. Green tea is also a known fat burner, and can be consumed copiously by dieters for its thermogenic properties.

Ingredients:

  • 8 bags of Green Tea.
  • 1 cup pure Pomegranate juice (Trader Joes has a great organic one that I like).

Directions:

  • Steep eight tea bags with seven cups of boiling water for about 15 minutes in a Pyrex container.
  • Remove tea bags.
  • Allow to cool to room temperature.
  • Add 1 cup of pomegranate juice (Or to taste).
  • Chill and serve over ice cubes.
  • Drink several glasses daily to prevent heart disease, and increase fat burning.
  • One eight ounce glass is only about 20 calories! If you are trying to get off diet soda, a Villain of the Kitchen Table, this Whole Foods cocktail should be your new best friend! Diet pop actually makes you fat, this recipe will burn fat.

Variations:

  • For parties add some festive garnishes: Mint, lemon balm, lavender, fruit, and edible flowers will surely make you look like Martha Stewart gone on a health rampage. Plop a few frozen blueberries or raspberries in there as well to make it look interesting, or chop a bunch of fruit and create an herbal non-alcoholic “sangria” for your guests.
  • Black tea is also high in polyphenols for those that don’t care about burning fat, you may also use Oolong, White Tea, or any herbal tea. Have fun with the ingredients you have readily on hand.
  • For stress relief, grab a box of herbal stress relief tea like Celestial Seasonings “Tension Tamer” or a “Night Night” tea and enjoy iced with your favorite fruit juice.
  • For diarrhea, mix heavily steeped black tea with blueberry juice. The tannins have an astringent quality on the gut that serve to stop diarrhea. For extra tannins, try a bit of cinnamon too if you like!
  • Add a pinch of sea salt and you have yourself an herbal fat burning organic sports drink! For long work out sessions you may also want to increase the amount of juice in the recipe.
  • For sick children, mixing pure juice and prescribed herbal teas (not caffeinated!) prevents dehydration while also treating illness. Add a pinch of sea salt for electrolytes.

If you have your own favorite herbal iced tea recipe, feel free to share it in the comments section.

Isn’t being healthy so much fun?

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen table!

~ Dr. Nicole Sundene

Naturopathic Physician
www.KitchenTableMedicine.com

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Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Dairy Free Banana Ice Cream Recipe

diets.jpgIf I can make this easy whole foods recipe then anyone can!

This recipe for dairy free banana “ice cream” is a piece of dairy free cake to make for those that are allergic or intolerant to dairy. If you long for something cold and creamy, banana ice cream should surely satisfy.

Eating bananas instead of fattening ice cream is also a healthy whole foods way to lose weight and feel better.

Although bananas have been given a bad rap by dieters when you weigh in the average 100 calories in a banana next to a large fattening bowl of ice cream, the banana is going to win hands down! Plus bananas have all the fiber, potassium, vitamins, and minerals that ice cream can’t compete with.

Ingredients: Frozen Bananas

Directions: Peel, chop in large chunks, and freeze overly ripe (not brown) bananas. Place in Cuisinart food processor. Blend until smooth and creamy. Enjoy alone or add some organic chocolate sauce for garnish! If you are dairy intolerant be sure to use dairy free chocolate sauce or other alternative topping.

Variations: If you are lazy (er… efficient and REALLY busy) like me, or don’t have a Cuisinart then you can just chop the frozen bananas up and enjoy with some organic chocolate sauce, raspberries, or strawberries. See what other kinds of frozen fruits can easily be made in to “ice cream”. If you have a child that is allergic to dairy, giving them fresh fruit “ice cream” is a fun way to get more whole foods in to your kids. Be sure to call it “ice cream” so they are excited to eat this whole foods treat!

To save money I purchase bunches of bananas when they are on sale and then chop in thirds and freeze for smoothies and other healthy treats.

Thanks for stopping by my kitchen table!

~Dr. Nicole

Naturopathic Physician

www.KitchenTableMedicine.com

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Rosemary Salmon Recipe

img_7478.jpgIf I can make this recipe, then ANYONE can make this recipe. Combining the simple whole foods ingredients of salmon with rosemary is not only great for the cardiovascular system, but memory and concentration as well.

The omega-3 oils combine nicely with the anti-oxidant and circulatory properties of the rosemary to give your brain a much needed mental boost! This is brain food at it’s finest people! Try eating this salmon for lunch to have a productive afternoon. This is the perfect recipe for someone with ADHD.

Dr. Nicole’s Rosemary Remembrance Salmon Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Whole Foods Diet Resources

March 28, 2008 by Dr. Nicole Sundene  
Filed under Recipes

The key to adopting a Whole Foods Diet is to find one new whole foods recipe to try each week. Over time, and after enough trial and error you should easily have a bunch of healthy recipe ideas in your arsenal.

The weekend is a great time to practice a new recipe with your friends or family as well as grocery shop for next week’s healthy menu. I have included links to some favorite whole foods recipes I can’t wait to try out! Feel free to add your latest and greatest favorite healthy recipes to the comments section for all to enjoy! I love a good healthy recipe success story. Trust me I also have plenty of recipe disasters to keep you all laughing. Just keep trying and just keep laughing… Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Sprouting for Health

January 24, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Recipes

When almost any bean, grain or seed is soaked overnight and allowed to grow, sprouting of the new plant occurs, in a burst of vitality, releasing its stored nutrients. These tiny, new and easy-to-digest plants literally contain the best of what the plant has to offer, since they are at their nutritional peak. During the sprouting process, vitamin and enzyme content dramatically increase, while starch is converted into simple sugars, protein is turned into amino acids and peptides, and fat is converted to free fatty acids—in essence, the sprouting process predigests the nutrients, making them easier to assimilate and metabolize when we consume them.

The vital life energy (vis medicatrix naturae) and enzymes in sprouts stimulate the body’s inherent self-cleansing and healing abilities, and if no heavy cooked foods are concomitantly consumed, it speeds up our metabolism because it’s not slowed down by hard-to-digest food. Sprouts’ high water content is cleansing, they are rich in nitrilosides (substances that break down into chemicals called benzaldehydes that selectively destroy only cancer cells) and high quality Vitamin E, among many other vital nutrients.

Many beans, grains and seeds are available for sprouting such as: adzuki beans, alfalfa, barley, buckwheat, chickpea/garbanzo bean, clover, fenugreek, flax seed, lentil, mung bean, pumpkin, radish, sesame, soybean, sunflower seeds, and wheat to name a few.

Warning: Most sprouts can be eaten raw. An important exception is the sprouted soybean, which contains a toxin that is destroyed by cooking.

Contraindications: Individuals with Lupus (systemic or discoid) should avoid alfalfa sprouts, as alfalfa in any form can exacerbate or prompt a flare-up of symptoms. Individuals with food allergies, intolerances or sensitivities should avoid the sprouts of any problem bean, grain, nut or seed.

Culinary Uses
The crisp, crunchy texture of sprouts makes them a great addition to salads and sandwiches and you can use them raw (except soybean) or cooked in a great many dishes, adding them whole for just the last minute of cooking. Steaming is another popular cooking method, but don’t overcook! Alfalfa sprouts should only be eaten raw. Wheat sprouts are also best raw. Cook all large sprouts.

• To sauté sprouts, place a small amount of oil in a pan, add sprouts and a small amount of water or tamari sauce. Cover and cook 5-10 minutes, depending on your taste. Minced onion or mushrooms browned in the oil add flavor, as do shredded carrots, turnips and cabbage.
• Sprouted wheat berries may be ground and added to bread dough, where they assist in the rising process and add flavor. If adding a cup of sprouted wheat berries, subtract ½ cup of flour and ½ cup of water from the recipe.

Sprout and Bean Salad: Stir together 16 oz. cooked red kidney beans, 8 oz. raw chopped bean sprouts, 2 stalks chopped celery, ½ of a diced green bell pepper, ½ of a finely chopped onion. Make the dressing from 6 Tablespoons of olive or canola oil, a dash of barley malt sweetener, the juice of one lemon, and a dash of Spike seasoning. Season to taste. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss. Garnish with chopped cilantro.

How to Grow Your Own

  • Use a quart or half-gallon jar for sprouting. If using the larger size, then double the amount of
    seeds used.
  • Be sure to buy high quality, organic seeds for sprouting.
  • Rinse the seeds in lukewarm water.
  • The time for soaking and sprouting varies with each seed and according to the environment.
  • Place two tablespoons of seeds (1/2 cup legumes or grains) in the jar with three times as much water as seeds.
  • Soak overnight.
  • Many small seeds require four hours of soaking, while some require none. Seeds with very hard coats, like guar, require two days of soaking.
    After soaking, drain the water from the jar.
  • Rinse the seeds in fresh lukewarm water and drain again.
  • Lay the jar at an angle of about 70 degrees in a warm (70-80 degrees), dark place so the
    seeds can drain. (Cover with a dishcloth or similar cloth or put the jar in a dark place that gets
    neither too hot nor too cold.)
  • It is important to rinse and drain the seeds twice a day. If they dry out, the seeds are ruined. In hot, dry weather, the seeds may need to be rinsed more often.
  • All sprouts do better wrapped or kept in the dark until ready to “green”.
  • This rinsing and draining process continues for three days at least (or until sprouts are as long as desired). Then they are taken out from the dark place or from under the towel and allowed to “green” in a sunny window- still taking care to not let them dry out.

Suppliers:

Life Sprouts, P.O. Box 150, Paradise, UT 84328 (1-800-241-1516)

http://www.lifesprouts.com/

Resources
1. Balch, Phyllis and James. Prescription for Cooking and Dietary Wellness, Revised. 1992. P.A.B. Publishing, Inc.
2. Morgan, Barbara (editor-in-chief). Foods That Harm, Foods That Heal: An A-Z Guide To Safe and Healthy Eating. 1997. The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc.
3. Onstad, Dianne. Whole Foods Companion. 1996. Chelsea Green Publishing.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Ayurvedic Vegetarian Recipes

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Ayurvedic cooking offers some wonderfully new and unusual ways to cook vegetables.

SAUTÉED BROCCOLI

5 cups chopped broccoli
1–2 Tbs. ghee (directions below)
1/2 tsp. mustard seed
1/4 tsp. cumin seed
1/8 tsp. hing (available at Indian or international stores, also called asafetida)
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tsp. turmeric
2 tsp. coriander powder
3/4 tsp. sea salt

1 Tbs. fresh lemon or lime juice

Chop broccoli into 1/2 inch pieces (yes, that is small). Heat ghee in a large, heavy skillet, then add mustard and cumin seeds, hing and garlic. When the mustard seeds begin to pop, add the turmeric and then the broccoli. Stir well to coat. Add remaining ingredients and mix well. Cook uncovered until broccoli is tender, but still bright green, around 10–15 minutes. The smell of this cooking will stimulate your appetite.
This dish works well with rice, soup, and with some meats like chicken and denser fish.

GHEE
(This is also called clarified butter.) Take 1/4 to 1 pound of butter and melt over a low heat. As it heats, notice the milk solids that come to the surface and fall to the bottom. The clear stuff in the middle is the ghee. Heat until there is definite separation, remove quickly from heat, and allow to cool for a few minutes. Skim off any scum at the surface and pour the clear liquid into a container. Ghee will keep in the refrigerator for many months. (Discard the milk solids.)

DARK LEAFY GREENS

 1 bunch dark leafy greens (collards, kale, mustard, turnip, dandelion)
 1/2 to 3/4 cup water

 1 tsp. sunflower oil or ghee
 1/2 tsp. whole cumin seeds
 1 tsp. coriander powder

Wash and chop greens, taking out the stems. Steam greens over hot water on low heat until tender, about 7–15 minutes. Drain. (You may save the water, if it’s not bitter, for soup.)
Heat oil in small sauté pan over low heat. Add cumin seeds and as they brown, stir in coriander. Brown the mixture. Pour over the drained greens and mix well. Serve immediately.

GREEN BEAN BHAJI

 4 cups fresh green beans
 1 Tbs. sunflower oil or ghee
 1/2 tsp. black mustard seeds
 1/8 tsp. hing
 1 tsp. turmeric
 2–6 Tbs. water
 1/2 tsp. sea salt
 1 inch fresh chopped ginger root
 1 small fresh green chili pepper (great for taste, may omit)
 1/2 cup chopped fresh coriander leaves (cilantro)
 shredded unsweetened coconut

Wash beans and chop into one-inch pieces. Warm oil or ghee in large skillet with lid. Add mustard seeds and warm until they pop. Add the turmeric and hing and stir well. Add chopped green beans and 2–3 Tbs. water. Cover and cook on low until beans are tender (15–30 minutes). Put the remaining water and ingredients into blender and puree. Pour over the beans and mix well. Simmer for 1–2 minutes until well mixed. Garnish with coriander leaves and coconut.

CUMIN ZUCCHINI

 2 medium zucchini
 3 shitake mushrooms, dried
 2 Tbs. ghee
 1/2 tsp. whole cumin seed

Soak mushrooms in a cup of water for 10 minutes or until tender. Heat ghee in medium-sized heavy skillet. Add cumin seeds and heat until they brown. Wash and slice zucchini. Drain and slice mushrooms. Add zucchini and mushrooms to mixture and stir, cooking for 5 minutes on medium heat.

FRESH DILLED ZUCCHINI

 2 medium zucchini
 1 bunch fresh dill
 2 Tbs. sunflower oil
 1/2 tsp. turmeric
 1/8 tsp. hing
 1/2 tsp. water
 1 Tbs. barley malt or brown rice syrup
 2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice
 1-1/2 tsp. coriander powder

Wash and finely chop dill. Wash zucchini and cut into one-inch slices. Heat oil in medium-size heavy skillet. Add turmeric, hing, zucchini, and water. Cover and cook 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients and cook 5 more minutes. May top with yogurt for a different taste.

SWEET STEAMED BEETS

 4 cups raw beets (5–6 medium beets)
 2 Tbs. ghee
 2 Tbs. fresh lemon or lime juice
 1 Tbs. coriander powder

Wash and slice the beets into 1/8- to 1/4 inch slices. Pour one inch of water in the bottom of a heavy medium-sized pot and add steamer. After bringing to a boil, add beets and steam until tender, about 20–25 minutes. Drain.
Melt ghee in small pan. Add lemon juice and coriander and mix well. Pour over beets and serve.
SWEETENED CARROTS

 4 cups sliced carrots (4 medium)
 1 Tbs. sunflower oil
 1/2 tsp. mustard seeds
 1/2 tsp. turmeric
 1/8 tsp. hing
 1/2 tsp. sea salt (or less)
 1 tsp. coriander powder
 1/4 hot green pepper, chopped (optional)
 3 Tbs. water
 1 tsp. maple syrup

Wash and slice carrots. In heavy skillet heat oil and add mustard seeds. When they pop, add turmeric, hing, carrots, salt, pepper, and coriander. Cook, uncovered, over medium heat, stirring frequently for 2–3 minutes. Add water and maple syrup. Cover and cook for 5 minutes over low heat.

CURRIED NUT SOUP

 1 Tbs. butter or 2 Tbs. olive oil
 2 large cloves crushed garlic
 1 cup finely chopped onion
 2 Tbs. freshly grated ginger root
 1 tsp. sea salt

Sauté the above ingredients in a large kettle over medium heat.

 1 cup chopped raw nuts (peanuts, almonds, etc.)
 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
 1/4 tsp. cloves

 1/4 tsp. ground cardamom or coriander
 1/2 tsp. dry mustard
 1/2 tsp. turmeric
1 tsp. ground cumin

Add these ingredients and sauté, stirring, another 8–10 minutes over lower heat.

 2 cups vegetable stock or water
 1/2 cup natural nut butter
 1 Tbs. honey
 cayenne pepper to taste (1/8–1/2 tsp.)

Mix together thoroughly and add to the sauté mixture. Mix well and simmer, covered over very low heat, for one hour. Stir occasionally to prevent sticking. Just before serving whisk in:

 1-1/2 cups buttermilk (at room temperature to prevent curdling)

Top with the following mix, or invent your own.

Topping

 2 green bananas (you wouldn’t eat them for another 2 days)
 juice of 1 lemon
 3 Tbs. butter or olive oil
 1/4 tsp. cardamom
 1/4 tsp. turmeric
 1 Tbs. sesame seeds

Slice bananas and marinade in lemon juice for 10 minutes. Heat the butter, add bananas and other ingredients, and sauté over low heat for about 5 minutes. This is spooned onto the bowl of soup just before eating. You may experiment with other fruits instead of bananas. Raisins are good added to this topping, and apricots and apples are too.
Serve the above soup with a rice dish for a great meal combination.

RICE AND GREEN PEA DISH

 2 cups brown rice
 3 cups water
 2 cups freshly steamed peas
 1/2 cup onion, sliced and steamed
 1 cup sweet red pepper, sliced and steamed

Cook the brown rice in 3 cups of water until tender. Usually takes 35–50 minutes. Toss with vegetables and season to taste with salt, black or white pepper, and cayenne.

If a meal does not feel complete without bread and butter, try bread and olive oil in place of butter. You can also soak herbs in the olive oil for a few days: basil, rosemary, garlic. Or try flat bread and yogurt dip for a more exotic taste.

YOGURT DIP

 2 cups yogurt
 1 cucumber, seeded and finely minced
 1 sweet yellow or red pepper, seeded and minced

Season to taste. Some options include:

 cumin and garlic
 dill
 basil
 cayenne
 honey
 lemon juice

This dip is great with flat bread or with raw vegetables or fruits.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
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