Tell Me What is in your Shopping Cart and I will Tell You What is Wrong with You…

My favorite thing to do at the grocery store is people watch.

Oftentimes my blatant stares are grossly mis-interpreted when in fact I am simply mesmerized by someone’s cart full of only bacon, yellow cheese, mayo, beer and white bread. “Wow that looks like an eczema fest followed by a heart attack on a plate”, I will silently think to myself as I rudely size up the health status of a stranger.

After years of interviewing people about their diet I have learned that many common disease states accompany the same bad food choices. Classics like diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and high blood sugar all have very consistent dietary patterns. When I see a healthy vibrant person in a sweatsuit with a cart full of fruits and veggies, I feel that much more motivated to shop the perimeter of the store and avoid all the processed foods that lie in the “Danger Zone” within. When you think about it the perimeter of the store has all the produce and other whole foods choices. Fill your cart with those choices first before venturing in to the “Danger Zone”. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Can you give up dessert?

April 4, 2008 by Dr. Nicole Sundene  
Filed under Diabetes, Diet Tips, Weight Loss

Author: Dr. Nicole Sundene

pieceofcake.jpgRecently a friend had lost a bunch of weight and was looking really good, so being the nosy doctor that I am, I asked what technique he used. He said he simply decided to “never eat desserts again”.

Wow, he lost about 20 pounds just from giving up dessert! In America it is a common cultural concept to eat a huge meal and then five minutes later stuff ourselves even more BEYOND full with a large piece of dessert. Dessert is such a habit here that half the time we eat it without even wanting it. This is exactly how we all unwittingly gain the average five to ten extra pounds each year compounded by the depressing reality that each year our metabolism goes down a percentage point.

The typical dessert runs between 400-1000 calories, so say for instance we decide to give up an average dessert of 500 calories for seven days straight. That easily calculates in to the 3500 calorie deficit one must attain in order to lose one pound of body fat. That math was just too simple! Although both would be ideal, you could run for four hours a week or you could simply give up dessert each night. Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Evolution and Weight Loss

February 27, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Diet Tips, Discipline

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHave you ever wondered why when you have a craving it is for such yummies as chocolate, cheese, or chips?

We as human beings have evolved to want to eat the sweetest and fattest things that we can because it gives us more “bang for our buck”. Or, more calories to store in our hips, thighs and belly for the long winter nights.

Everyone who is alive today has made an incredible evolutionary journey through times of very little food. We have a built-in need to want to store fat for the times of lean. What happens now, particularly in the United States, is there are no times of lean. We can get food at all hours of the day and mostly we do.

So understanding that part of what is driving us is a biological imperative may help you be kinder to yourself when you find yourself with an empty bag of chips in your hand at midnight. This does not mean, of course, that you should throw up your hands and decide that you have no control whatsoever and should then eat pizza (which is one of my favorite foods) and dessert any chance you can.

You do have control over your immediate environment. For instance, if it is not in the house, then late at night when you get the “bingies” (this is my weakest time, I don’t know about you) you won’t find anything to binge on. When you are first trying to lose weight, your body’s evolutionary “memory” will make it very hard to resist these foods so it is better not to be surrounded by them.

Read more

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Weight Loss Goals by Bonnie Pfiester

Many of us may even have the same annoying resolutions we neglect to keep each year. It’s not that we don’t want to keep them, but I think we forget that resolutions are not just words, desires or a phase. A resolution is supposed to be a pledge, an oath, a promise – and it requires change.

Think of it like a marriage. Marriage is the ultimate commitment where we make very important promises, which also requires change. “In sickness and in health, for richer or poorer, ‘til death do us part.” There is a reason for these promises. God knows we will not always want or feel like loving the other. We pledge our commitment to love the other no matter what. These vows are the beginning of a whole new way of life which requires a daily decision to stick with it.

Of course, weight loss and health will always be at the top of the list of resolutions made. It’s not going to be enough to want to be skinny. It’s not going to even be enough to write it down or join a gym. You must commit to making a lifestyle change and stick with it.

Once a person is married, it is not healthy to continue doing some of the things they once did when they were single. In the same way, there are things that must change when deciding to live a healthy lifestyle. You can’t just do whatever you want without repercussions. The whole “have your cake and eat it too” rarely works in marriages or diets. In order to be healthy, you have to live healthy – day in and day out, whether you feel like it or not.

For this to work, you and your new lifestyle must be a priority. I don’t know many things that trump your health. Family is important and so are your friends, but you can’t be a good spouse, parent, boss, employee or friend if you don’t have your health. Unfortunately, unlike a marriage, you can’t divorce yourself either. You are stuck with you for the rest of your life so you are fooling yourself if you think it’s not a priority.

Truth is, this time you can’t afford for it not to be.

Author: Bonnie Pfiester, personal trainer

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Falling Victim to the Monkey Trap

Moving on in many ways means saying goodbye. The problem is, goodbyes are often hard, even when the place we are headed may be a good place to be. I don’t know why it is so hard to let go of the past, but it is. We prefer the “known” over the unknown I guess. Ironically, we often prefer the known even if the known is not a good place to be.

It may sound crazy, but I believe many of us don’t get to experience a lot of great things in life because we have such a strong grip on the past. This issue can also affect us when attempting to make New Year’s resolutions – especially when it comes to weight loss.

It reminds me the story of the monkey trap. The trap is basically a hollowed out coconut filled with rice. The coconut, which is chained to a stake, has a small hole in it just big enough for the monkey’s hand to go in but too small for his closed fist of rice to come out. Crazy as it seems, the monkey cannot see that freedom without rice is more valuable than being captured with it, and is trapped.

Like the monkey, we are often scared of losing something, like a favorite food or a certain lifestyle. While pride may stand in the way for some, others hold on to excuses. Unfortunately, many people simply accept things the way they are as if there were no other choice. In essence, we are no different than the monkey – trapped by our own decisions.

Sometimes we need to take a closer look at what is standing in the way of our success. What do we have such a tight grip on? What has kept us from making our New Year’s Resolutions stick last year or what prevented us from even making them to begin with? Whatever your answer is, this year is the year to let go so you can move on.

Bonnie Pfeister, personal trainer
www.longevityclubs.com

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Healthy Dining

January 24, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Diet Tips

As a group, senior citizens generally report being the most satisfied with mealtimes: they tend to eat earlier and have more established rituals than younger persons or families. Everyone benefits from the peace of mind that comes from a structured routine. Researchers say that following daily patterns such as eating at regular times may help keep the body’s internal rhythms synchronized. Without external cues, the daily or circadian (body-clock) rhythms such as sleepiness, peak mental sharpness, body temperature, blood pressure and hormone levels may get out of balance. Regular eating times also primes the digestive system for optimum functioning (timing of digestive enzyme secretion, peristalsis, etc.)

Certain Foods at Certain Times: Gather recipes for family favorites and turn them into a family cookbook. Ask relatives to jot down reminiscences about the dish and the people they shared the meal with.
Doing Kitchen Duty: Chopping vegetables and stirring pots may become soothingly methodical, especially when shared with others. Turn off the television, play some soothing dinner music and talk about your day.
Setting the Table: Putting plates and utensils in their proper places around the table is part of ritual—most people tend to sit in the same place either out of tradition or necessity. The color of the tableware is important to the overall mood. Red stimulates the appetite and mood. Blue is calming. White connotes cleanliness (or sterility). Fresh flowers or a bowl of fresh local produce ties us to our natural environment, reminding us of the season, the region or climate in which we live. Candlelight can make any meal special.
Food Presentation: Edible flowers make colorful, fragrant, flavorful garnishes. Try daisies, marigolds, nasturtiums, geraniums, pansies, lavender, roses and violets. (Avoid if have allergies/sensitivities.). Cut vegetables on an angle. Cut sandwiches into triangles or with cookie cutters. Strive for an array of colorful produce, brown whole grains and beans, pasta, etc. Use big wooden serving bowls, colorful ceramic platters, hollowed bread loaves, hollowed melons, etc. Plates should not be too large—it makes servings appear small and people tend to eat more. Likewise with vivid patterns on plates.
Table Talk: Mealtime is a prime opportunity to share stories and discuss the day. Give everyone a chance to speak, taking turns around the table. Give thanks for the good things in your life.
Cleaning Up: It’s the perfect opportunity to share work responsibility. It can also be soothingly methodical if done in a well-defined order.

Restaurant Meals (Tips for Healthy Dining-Out)

• The way foods are prepared tells a lot about how healthy they’re likely to be. Terms such as roasted, baked, braised, grilled, stir-fried, poached or steamed indicate that they’re relatively low in fat. On the other hand, terms such as au gratin, breaded, creamy, flaky, scalloped, fried and pan-fried indicate relatively high fat preparation methods. Make special requests—likely the restaurant will happily accommodate you.

• Choose simply prepared whole foods: broiled fish, legumes, steamed and raw vegetables, whole grain breads or cooked whole grains. Clear soups and salads with oil and vinegar (vinaigrette) type dressings are good choices for a light meal. Eating a clear soup appetizer (as opposed to going straight to the entrée) will likely result in 25% fewer calories consumed by the end of the meal. Ask for salad dressing on the side and dip your fork in it rather than have it tossed into the salad.

• Order from the appetizer side of the menu along with clear soup and salad.

• Smarter buffet picks: bread without butter, cherry tomatoes, cooked vegetables, raw vegetables, fresh fruit, leafy greens, lean protein, yogurt. Be aware that variety of foods (buffet or sampling several entrees) and eating in groups induces overeating. Use a small plate—you’ll feel like the portions are larger than they actually are.

• Smarter “fast food” picks: salads with vinegar and oil based dressings, baked potatoes with broccoli, vegetable stir-fry with rice, broiled chicken, bean burritos. Best condiments: mustard, ketchup, lettuce, tomato, onions, relish and pickles.

• Restaurants stay in business by making it easy for you to order more food than you need. A simple strategy is to order a pitcher of water for the table—you may think you’re hungry when you’re actually thirsty (most people are dehydrated to some extent). Sip water throughout the meal to naturally reduce your appetite. Avoid alcohol (cocktails) before dinner.

• Wait for 20 minutes after the meal before ordering dessert—it can take that long for the satiety signal to reach your brain. You may find that you really don’t want dessert after all. Choose fruit and/or low-fat yogurt combinations, if available.

Healthful Snacking

Experts now say that well-paced eating of nutrient-dense foods throughout the day can complement regular meals and even fill gaps in your diet, helping you stay healthier overall, more alert and energetic and likely eating fewer calories throughout the course of the day. Have some of these foods available in your refrigerator or pantry at all times: Baked potato or sweet potato, grapes, banana, tuna, dried apricots, low-fat yogurt, low-fat string cheese, strawberries, orange, cottage cheese, almonds, sunflower seeds, brown rice cakes, whole grain pretzels, air-popped popcorn, crudités (cucumber slices, cherry tomatoes, carrot and celery sticks).

Great combo snacks:
• Apple slices or brown rice cakes with nut butter
• Low-fat yogurt with nuts and berries
• Raw cheese on whole grain crackers
• Hummus and crudités/raw vegetables
• Low-fat cottage cheese with pineapple chunks
• Baked potato topped with yogurt or salsa
• Baked tortilla chips with salsa

Resources
Ayoob, Keith et al. Healing Foods. 2000. International Masters Publishers.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Eating to Nourish

PhotobucketEmotional Nourishment – Many people eat when they are not hungry; instead they are lonely, bored, angry, or feeling empty inside. This is how food becomes medicine. The food might displace the feelings temporarily, but that empty feeling is still there. During times like these it is very important to be one’s own best friend. Allow the feelings of loneliness, depression, or boredom. It’s really okay to feel all these emotions; everyone does from time to time. If the feelings get too overwhelming, do something to pampering. Take a relaxing bath, read a favorite book, or do whatever feels good.

Self-talk – Self-talk can be critical, worrisome and negative, it can worsen depression and promote old behaviors. Work toward developing the inner voice (self- talk) into a coach. The job of the coach is to provide guidance, inspiration and praise; tell the truth objectively without judgment; and provide direction and support. Positive self-talk can help during the hard times and increase motivation.

Troublesome thoughts – Feeling down, ask: “What is going on for me right now?” Thoughts have a tendency to persist and grow, so that by the time they are noticed, they have snowballed into big negative patterns. If it’s difficult to identify the troublesome thoughts, keep a journal and write down the thoughts, especially just before and after eating. Take periodic thought inspection breaks, especially before meals. If critical, negative thoughts persist take a moment to replace this talk with accepting, supportive and encouraging thoughts.

Reasonable goals – If goals or expectations are high and constantly changing – this is a set-up for failure. Avoid setting abstract goals like “I want to lose thirty pounds”. Set specific, concrete behavioral goals such as, “I’ll increase my exercise to 30 minutes a day, five days a week, and I’ll eat 1600 to 1800 calories a day”. Avoid strict commands like “I’ll never eat another cookie”, or “I’ll always exercise every day”. Such resolutions are sure-fire tickets to failure. Leave room to make mistakes or deviate somewhat, because human beings are not perfect.

What is working? – There is a tendency to dwell on mistakes, which can lead to decreased motivation. Give credit where credit is due. If there are things that are working, take note and incorporate them often. This will encourage continued success for the weight loss program.
Solve problems – What if no credit is due? What if there was an all-day binge? Again, the internal dialogue (self-talk) is crucial. Critical, negative thoughts will lead to feeling worse; ignoring the incident, will increase the chances it will happen again. Instead, say, “O.K., I didn’t have a good day, but that doesn’t mean I’m terrible”. Problem solve for ways to interrupt the pattern the next time it occurs. Learn from mistakes; don’t be defeated by them.

Accept yourself – Some people are afraid that accepting themselves at their current weight will lead to inaction – they won’t feel the need to change their habits. However, belittling and criticizing will not motivate change. Self-acceptance means truthfully acknowledging good qualities and imperfections. It also means treating the body as a prized possession. So, remember love and acceptance is key.

Weight loss booster shot – Weight loss can be multi-faceted – self-talk, self-love, determination, small changes, and attainable, reasonable goals. A low-fat, high fiber diet incorporating adequate protein, vegetables, grains, fruits, and lots of water, at least eight glasses per day, is a great plan. An experienced nutritionist or naturopathic practitioner can help tailor a plan that includes nutrition and exercise to facilitate weight loss. Remember to be loving and gentle. Congratulations – this is a big step toward long-term health, happiness, and well being.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

General Eating Guidelines

January 11, 2008 by Kitchen Table Medicine  
Filed under Diet Tips

Photobucket

  • Appreciate the nourishment process.
  • Recognize how essential food is and make room for it everyday.
  • Take a moment to relax before eating; let the tension of the day go; open to receive nourishment; prepare for eating.
  • Light a candle.
  • Turn off the television or talk radio – create a peaceful space for mealtime.
  • Eat slowly, take small bites, chew well, and put utensils down after each bite.
  • Whenever possible choose the freshest, least processed, locally grown, seasonal foods. These choices can support the community.
  • Choose whole foods, including whole grains and whole grain products and unprocessed vegetables and fruits on a daily basis.
  • Recognize the relationship between food and the world. Organically grown foods can help promote sustainability. Non-packaged products reduce waste and products with recyclable packaging can be recycled and/or reused.
  • Balance food choices by eating a variety of food types, colors, and categories.
  • Explore ethnic cuisines that offer a great variety of spices, seasonings, traditions, and nourishment.

Eating to Nourish: Food is what fuels the body; it is nourishment. To nourish means to feed or sustain with substances necessary for life and growth. The process of eating is an experience of the senses; it should be enjoyable as well as nourishing, needing to be balanced with what is healthy to allow for growth and healing of the body. Food should be thought of as nourishing not just as part of the daily routine. Listed below are some considerations concerning different aspects of food and eating:

Attitude: How we feel and think about food and eating play a major role in how the food we take affects our body. Sitting down for a meal or a snack can be a time for regrouping of our thoughts, or for enjoying someone’s company. It can be a time to explore the senses of taste, smell, touch, and sight; learn to experience those sensations. This is a time to reassess attitudes and habits about food and eating.

Diet: Food should be balanced and contain variety: include fish, meat, poultry, and fresh vegetables and fruit, nuts, grains, and legumes. Drink plenty of water daily.

Shopping: This can also be an experience for the senses. It should not be done in too much haste, especially when beginning to make a change in eating habits. Food should be bought and eaten as fresh as possible; choose fruit and vegetables that are crisp and rich in color. Choose raw or dry roasted nuts that haven’t been exposed to open air too long. Look for fresh meats, poultry, and fish – ask the butcher for the best products. Quality is key.

Time: Taking the time to prepare food stimulates the palate and helps increase appreciation for eating. We all have different internal clocks to eat by. It is best not to go too long a time without eating. Our bodies give us signs when we need to take in food: feelings of hunger, headache, dizziness, decreased concentration, tiredness, clumsiness, irritability, and/or “spaciness”. It’s best to plan regularly spaced meals and snacks throughout the day to avoid these symptoms.

Digestion: The breakdown of food takes place in a relaxed phase; therefore it is most beneficial to eat in a sitting position rather than eating on the run. Mealtime should be a time of calm, not a time for family arguments, driving, business transactions or schoolwork. These types of actions have the tendency to cause tenseness, which is not very conducive to digestion.

Cooking & Preparation: Choose desirable flavorings and cooking methods that allow for maximum enjoyment of the food. Take a moment to arrange the food on the plate in a manner that is visually pleasing. One’s attitude when cooking and eating can affect how the food tastes. People don’t have to be gourmet cooks to take the care needed to prepare and cook food for the body and spirit.

Eating: To maximize the efficiency of the digestive process, take small bites and chew food thoroughly. The chewing process causes the release of saliva and enzymes in the mouth, which mixes with the food and stimulates enzymes and acid in the stomach. Chewing well decreases the amount of work the body has to do, making nutrient absorption more efficient.

After eating: It is best not to do heavy exercise or sleep after eating. A walk or light activity after meals can help the digestive system do its job.

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Decorating your Party Plate

January 2, 2008 by Dr. Nicole Sundene  
Filed under Diet Tips, Discipline

To bling or not to bling that is the question…

Although many tasty treats will be tempting me at various parties, I usually follow a pretty basic plan of attack to avoid letting them get the best of me. Gluttonous overeating can ruin the joy of socializing by zapping your energy, and making you fill ill. First and foremost fill your plate mostly with fruits and veggies.  Add a couple lean protein choice such as chicken, turkey, white cheese, hard boiled eggs, shrimp or salmon. The protein from these snacks combined with the fiber from the fruits and vegetables should reduce the glycemic load of the meal, thus stabilizing your blood sugar, and ultimately your energy levels.

Now that the protein “pants” of the plate have been picked out for the bottom half of the plate, and the top half of the plate’s outfit  has been dressed up with the perfect layers of fruits and veggies, you are ready to add your “bling” to your plate. Survey all your favorite treats and pick out one or two small ones that you will savor, a compromise to feeling deprived.  Dark chocolate truffles are always a good choice as they are satisfying while also rich in antioxidants. The key to not overeating typically is to simply not over restrict yourself. You can be perfect all you want in your free time, but finding the middle road and sticking to that is success in my opinion for most people in a party setting.

Survey all your favorite treats and pick out one or two that you will enjoy and will leave you not feeling deprived. These are your “bling”, I like to think of these treats as the “accessories”  for your plate.  According to Coco Chanel, less is more when accessorizing, and she always recommended to simply “take one thing off before walking out the door” in order to look fabulous.  Decide how hungry you are, and how important it is to you to have that extra bit of “holiday bling”. Did you work out today?  Then maybe you can have two “blings” and not just one. If you take two “blings” you always can reserve the right to take one off later.  Just leave it on the plate if you decide you don’t need it.

Be sure to sit down and take the time to really enjoy your food, especially the “bling”. You have my green light to liberally snack on fruits and veggies throughout the party.

Aside from preparing a perfect plate, try not to drink your calories by sticking to water as your primary beverage and limiting your consumption of alcohol. Try having a protein smoothie or similar snack before showing up at a party in order to avoid eating in a hungry holiday rage.  Boring parties are also a major cause of holiday overeating, so please do your best to avoid those whenever possible.

Remember the goal of the party is to socialize and have a fun time, and this is the recipe for success!

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

Eat More Fat to Prevent Heart Disease?

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketThis week, I will be discussing ways in which to prevent heart disease that may be, if not outright surprising, then at least somewhat intriguing.
The first surprising way to prevent heart disease is to eat more fat. So, I know what you are thinking, Wow! Are you telling me that I can go out and eat Big Macs and candy bars to my heart’s content???

Of course not…let’s have some common sense. What I am saying is that the more omega-3 fats you eat, the better it is for your heart. These fats are anti-inflammatory and inflammation has been shown to be a crucial step in developing plaque and heart disease.

Omega-3 fats are most commonly known to be found in fish, such as salmon, black cod or sablefish, and halibut. They are also found in foods like flaxseeds and walnuts. However, these vegetarian sources are made up of a slightly different type of omega-3 fat that your body has a harder time converting to the kind that it needs. In fact, research has not shown the same kinds of results from flaxseeds and walnuts as they have from fish.

So, eat your fish and love the fat because it loves you!

Photobucket Dr. Nicole Sundene, NMD is a licensed Naturopathic Medical Doctor at Fountain Hills Naturopathic Medicine 16719 E Palisades Blvd, Suite 205, Fountain Hills, AZ 85268.

She believes we should utilize natural medicines to treat the root cause of disease rather than just treating symptoms, as symptoms are a message of imbalance sent from the body and will persist until they are properly addressed.

For appointments please visit http://FHnaturopathic.com for more information about Naturopathic Medicine services.
©KitchenTableMedicine.com, LLC ™

« Previous Page